Category Archives: Street Art

*|MC:SUBJECT|*

table.mcnFollowContent {width:100% !important;}

table.mcnShareContent {width:100% !important;}

 

 

 

This Sunday, come Explore San Francisco and create some wonderful Mother’s Day memories to last a long time.

Take Mom out for a food tour and a cruise on the Bay for only $64!
Choose any of these food tours:

  • North Beach at Night
  • Mission Vegetarian
  • Little Saigon
  • Mission District South (24th Street)
  • The Real Chinatown

Paired with a Bay Cruise on San Francisco Bay!


To make reservations or for more information, please call:415.504.3636 x 102 or email: reservations@exploresf.bizLimited number of spots available
Golden Gate Bay CruiseOperated by:

Red and White Fleet

Give her the fun day she deserves
While making memories to last a lifetime

Share
Tweet
Forward
Facebook
Facebook
Twitter
Twitter
Website
Website
Copyright © *|CURRENT_YEAR|* *|LIST:COMPANY|*, All rights reserved.

Prague flower shop

Prague flower shop (Photo credit: jafsegal)

Enhanced by Zemanta
Advertisements

Hotel Hugo site specific art installation – Defenestration is now 16 years old – Brian Goggin

 

Defenestration Installation

Defenestration

1997-present

(Site-specific installation on the corner of 6th and Howard St. in San Francisco)

This multi-disciplinary sculptural mural involves seemingly animated furniture; tables, chairs, lamps, grandfather clocks, a refrigerator, and couches, their bodies bent like centipedes, fastened to the walls and window-sills, their insect-like legs seeming to grasp the surfaces. Against society’s expectations, these everyday objects flood out of windows like escapees, out onto available ledges, up and down the walls, onto the fire escapes and off the roof. “DEFENESTRATION” was created by Brian Goggin with the help of over 100 volunteers.

The concept of “DEFENESTRATION”, a word literally meaning “to throw out of a window,” is embodied by both the site and staging of this installation. Located at the corner of Sixth and Howard Streets in San Francisco in an abandoned four-story tenement building, the site is part of a neighborhood that historically has faced economic challenges and has often endured the stigma of skid row status. Reflecting the harsh experience of many members of the community, the furniture is of the streets, cast-off and unappreciated. The simple, unpretentious beauty and humanity of these downtrodden objects is reawakened through the action of the piece. The act of “throwing out” becomes an uplifting gesture of release, inviting reflection on the spirit of the people we live with, the objects we encounter, and the places in which we live.

The ground level has served as a rotating gallery

for the vibrant artwork of street muralists.



Operation Restore Defenestration

See Defenestration in person 

»»» See the restoration of Defenestration online

via Brian GogginDefenestration – Brian Goggin.

English: The "Defenestration" art pr...

English: The "Defenestration" art project by Brian Goggin on a building at 6th Street and Harrison Street in San Francisco. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Site-specific installation by Dan Flavin, 1996...

Site-specific installation by Dan Flavin, 1996, Menil Collection (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Enhanced by Zemanta

Kick Off Spring with These Three Art Shows | 7×7

Kick Off Spring with These Three Art Shows

Katharina Wulff, Die Verbindung (The Connection), 2008; oil on canvas;

48 1/16 x 68 7/8 in. (122 x 175 cm); Olbricht Collection; © Katharina

Wulff

The city’s museums now have their major exhibitions out and swinging (you’ve seen Foto Mexico and Gaultier; the ads plastered over town are maybe coaxing a return visit) and the gallery circuit is on the cusp of exploding into a big spring season. Our suggestion: take this weekend to explore some of the Bay’s slightly smaller, considerably less hyped, but no doubt equally fascinating museum shows. Here are three picks.

New Work: Katharina Wulff at SFMOMA

Katharina Wulff is unmistakably contemporary in how freely she channels the modern. Befitting for an institution that hangs the likes of Matisse and Dalí, Wulff’s whimsical and captivating paintings are at turns Fauvist, Surrealist and Dada. The whole of art history is the Moroccan-based artist’s playground.

Consisting of twenty works, this showing marks the artist’s first ever solo exhibition in the U.S., and, more importantly, her west coast debut. What can you expect? Much in the way of fantastical landscapes, confused perspective, bizarre-looking animals and still more bizarre-looking people. They brim with color and intrigue, never staying too long in any one place.

Katharina Wulff runs through September 4, 2012, at SFMOMA, 151 3rd Street

Modern Cartoonist: The Art of Daniel Clowes at Oakland Museum of California

Don’t call them comic books. The twenty first century graphic novel has elevated the panel-illustrated narrative to unprecedented heights. It’s been a thrilling and lucrative progression, and Oakland’s own Daniel Clowes has been at the forefront from the beginning. Some accounts would place this remarkably gifted illustrator, who has over fifty publications under his belt as well as an academy award nomination for screenplay, as the genre’s reigning patriarch.

The OMCA’s sprawling, installation-based show marks the first major survey of Clowe’s work to date. Complete with original drawings, artifacts and an extensive full-color monograph, this form of recognition is long overdue.

Modern Cartoonist runs through August 24, 2012, at Oakland Museum of California, 1000 Oak Street

Femmescapes at Mills College Art Museum

Femmescapes at Mills College Art Museum

A group of Mills College students were given a pretty amazing opportunity: to freely mine Lenore Pereira and Rich Niles’ marvelous collection of contemporary work by women artists. With names like Louise Bourgeois, Ann Hamilton and Francesca Woodman on the roster, this is a trove that many professional curators would probably kill for a chance to have at.

The resulting exhibition, Femmescapes, explores the various conceptual and metaphorical intertwinings of femininity and environment – nature as a woman, woman as land (lush, fertile, barren, etc.), body as landscape. Featuring about 40 works of painting, video, photography and sculpture, this is a unique glimpse not to be missed.

Femmescapes is on view Saturdays and Sundays only, through May 6, at 70 South Park

via Kick Off Spring with These Three Art Shows | 7×7.

Enhanced by Zemanta

What's happening today: Saturday, April 21, 2012 Sf Gate, Bay Guardian, Gay Cities Events

What’s happening today: Saturday, April 21, 2012

There is a lot happening today.

Deep Green Festival

A CELEBRATION OF CANNABIS, HEALTH & ECOLOGY

Not your average stoner gathering, the Deep Green Fest focuses on the utility of hemp as an economic andenvironmental resource. Political activists take note: a full day’s worth of lectures on cannabis policy is on tap, as well as 215 smoking areas and tons of smoke- friendly live jams on the numerous stages. noon-midnight, $12–$25 festival-only; $60–$75 conference admission.  Craneway Pavilion, 1414 Harbour, Richmond. (510) 735-1133, http://www.deepgreenfest.com

Cesar Chavez Festival– For too many of us, Cesar Chavez Day passes by in a blur of I’m-not-at-work (or dammit-I’m-at-work) chaos. We don’t really stop to celebrate the man, and that’s a shame because as you can tell from the way Rainbow Grocery shuts its door to celebrate him, he was a seminal figure in California history, Chicano history, and labor movement history. Luckily, we all get a hall pass this and every year if we didn’t observe the man on his state-sanctioned holiday. Today, the Mission will be marked by a parade in his honor, leading to a street fair on 24th Street with live music by Carlos Santana’s son Salvador, local hip-hop phenom Bang Data, and the Cuicacalli Youth Ballet Folklorico, among many other acts. 11am parade; noon-6pm fair, free Street fair: 24th St. between Bryant and Treat, SF (415) 621-2665, http://www.cesarchavezday.org

San Francisco Cherry Blossom Festival Today, 220,000 Attendees expected.

Today, Saturday, Apr 21 10:00a to 7:00p
at San Francisco Cherry Blossom FestivalSan FranciscoCA
Price: FREE to attend
Phone: (415) 563-2313
Age Suitability: All Ages

This year’s Northern California Cherry Blossom Festival will be held on Saturday and Sunday April 14-15 and April 21-22, 2012. All are welcome to join in the festivities as we celebrate Japanese and Japanese American culture in San Francisco’s Japantown! The festival will be held on Post Street between Laguna and Fillmore Streets. There will be food booths, cultural performances, martial arts, live bands, the annual Queen Program, and more. The Grand Parade will be held on April 22, beginning at City Hall and concluding in Japantown. The Northern California Cherry Blossom Festival is said to be the second largest festival outside of Washington, D.C. to celebrate the blooming of cherry blossoms; and held at one of three remaining Japantowns in the United States.

Steve Silver’s Beach Blanket Babylon

Today, Saturday, Apr 21 6:30p
at Club Fugazi, San Francisco, CA
The always-changing Steve Silver’s Beach Blanket Babylon is the world’s longest running musical revue. Packed with hilarious spoofs of pop culture & political characters, outrageously gigantic hats and one show-stopping number after another, the show continues to dazzle audiences at Club Fugazi in San Francisco’s North Beach district. read more
Categories: ComedyMusicals

Berkeley Dance Project 20122

Today, Saturday, Apr 21 8:00p
Three new choreographic works explore the theme of transformation. Amara Tabor-Smith will use the Sabar dance form as a metaphor for personal growth and cultural shifts; Stephanie Sherman will explore assimilation using costumes to challenge traditional ideas of identity; and Lisa Wymore will experiment with ritual and heightened physical states. read more
Categories: DancePerforming Arts

via San Francisco Bay Guardian | News, Politics, Music, Arts, Culture.

 

img_16559884_primary.jpg

The Naked and Famous

Today, Saturday, Apr 21 9:00p
at The Warfield, San Francisco, CA
The Naked and Famous New Zealand indie electronic ensemble the Naked and Famous make driving, melodic pop with an ’80s post-punk influence. Centered around the talents of vocalist Alisa Xayalith and instrumentalist/vocalist Thom Powers, the band formed in 2008 and released two EPs before adding members to play live….
Monty Pythons Spamalot Monty Pythons Spamalot 
The funniest show on earth is back to taunt San Francisco for a second time! Winner …
4/21/2012 Saturday 2:00p Orpheum Theatre, San Francisco CA
Featuring:  Monty Python’s Spamalot

Bill Bellamy  Bill Bellamy

4/21/2012 Saturday 9:30p Cobb’s Comedy Club, San Francisco CA
Featuring: Bill Bellamy

4th Annual Goat Festival  4th Annual Goat Festival

A Celebration of All Things Goat! – co-hosted by CUESA.org (the Center for Urban Education about Sustainable Agriculture) …

4/21/2012 Saturday 10:00a to 1:00p Ferry Plaza Farmer’s Market, San Francisco CA

Thats What She Said! That’s What She Said!

That’s What She Said is a variety show full of awesome women. This show features … 4/21/2012 Saturday 7:30p The Garage, San Francisco CA
Featuring: Caitlin Gill

The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the CatwalkThe Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk

Dubbed fashion’s enfant terrible, Jean Paul Gaultier launched his first prêt-à-porter …

4/21/2012 Saturday 9:30a to 5:15p
de Young Museum, San Francisco CA
  The Caretaker The Caretaker
The Caretaker – first performed in 1960 – was Harold Pinter’s first big hit. Fifty …

4/21/2012 Saturday 2:00p
Curran Theatre, San Francisco CA
Featuring: Jonathan Pryce
NPRs Says You! NPR’s Says You!
Host Richard Sher and hilarious panelists Barry Nolan, Francine Achbar, Tony Kahn …

4/21/2012 Saturday 2:00p
Jewish Community Center of San Francisco, San Francisco CA

Gay San Francisco Happenings Today Saturday 21, 2012

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

April 7 2012 is MAPP! Mission Arts & Performance Project! This is not an artwalk!

Event:

Mission Arts & Performance Project

Date:

April 7, 2012 6:00 pm

Cost:

FREE

Category:

All, April, Events, MAPP, Performing Arts

 

Venue:

Red Poppy Arthouse

Phone:

1.415.826.2402

Address:

Google Map

2698 Folsom St, San Francisco, 94110, United States

Mission Arts and Performance Project

 

 

The Misson Arts & Performance Project (MAPP) is a FREE bimonthly festival that happens the first Saturday of every other month. Join us for this Saturday, April 7th!

Performance Program:

6pm – “The ItCH” – Investing in the Creative Hunch (Social-Cultural networking)

7:15pm – Tom Sway (Writer of Remarkable Songs)

7:42pm – Adrian Arias presents “The Lost Literary” (short film)

8:00pm – Poet Michael Warr & the Armageddon of Funk (poetry w/ live music)

8:40pm – Amy Seiwert’s Imagery (solo contemporary ballet)

9:00pm – Embodiment Project (urban dance theater company)

9:45pm – Sriba Kwadjovie (solo modern/contemporary dance)

10:00pm – Teobi Dreams (work-in-progress experimental performance)

10:30pm – Fared Shafinury – Skyping from Texas (Indy-Persian music)

11:15am-12am – The Anti-Hype Lounge (youtube projection DJ)

 

Download MAPP Program PDF Here

 



What is the MAPP Project? 

Launched in 2003, the Mission Arts & Performance Project (MAPP) is a homegrown bi-monthly, multidisciplinary, unruly intercultural happening that takes place in the Mission District of San Francisco. Started by Founding Artist of the Red Poppy Art House, Todd Brown, MAPP has now produced over 48 neighborhood-level arts festivals.

MAPP is not an “art walk” (thank god). Instead, it’s a collage of 10-20 odd spaces transformed into micro art centers, focused on intimate artistic and cultural exchange among people. Placing art and performance on the street level, MAPP utilizes such alternative spaces as private garages, gardens, living rooms, studios, street corners, and small businesses. At its heart, the MAPP shows how ordinary spaces can be made extra-ordinary through creative techniques.

The MAPP also beautifully demonstrates how individuals in a community in partnership with one another can create an integrated arts festival that does not require an expansive budget, outside funding, or commercial marketing strategies, but can happen through the inspired efforts of artists and community members working together with a unified and inclusive vision.

Part of the charm of the MAPP is that you never know quite what’s going to happen until you get there! This innovative platform allows serendipitous connections to emerge organically across visual artists, musicians, poets, dancers, choreographers, filmmakers, playwrights, and other artists, community organizers and local residents. However, adopting this platform also means sometimes not all of the most up-to-date information is available ahead of time. The point is to arrive and embrace the adventure. Plus, you’ll get a program (with an actual map) to navigate the event.

Be sure to check out the other MAPP spaces as well. Download a PDF of the Program here.

ICAL IMPORT

via Mission Arts & Performance Project | Red Poppy Arthouse.

a street in the Mission District, for which th...

a street in the Mission District, for which the festival was named (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Enhanced by Zemanta

ART on STREETS: Swoon in the Mission | Untapped SF

swoon

swoon

ART on STREETS: Swoon in the Mission | Untapped SF

ART on STREETS: Swoon in the Missionby faern

One of the most enjoyable things about living in the city of San Francisco is how visually dynamic it is. There is simply art everywhere, but not in a way that inundates you. The most interesting pieces are hidden away in nooks and crannies that you may not even see. ART on STREETS highlights this city’s art through the lens of a “Polaroid” camera (except it’s various apps on the iPhone). Each week we will feature a different soundtrack for your viewing pleasure: a single song from a Bay Area musical artist. So plug in your earbuds (or not) and have a listen while you check out the art.

This week we are checking out a piece by the artist Swoon. On a recent visit to our fair city she graced us with this paste-up over on Hampshire, right at 24th Street. If you are going to check it out in person, I suggest that you do it soon—with all this rain, it may not stick to those bricks for long. Incorporating an abundance of nature and art history references, this piece is very bright and flowing, and carries a lot of emotion. However, I particularly appreciate its placement. The only artwork set against a monochromatic brick wall—at the end of a pretty residential block—it jumps right out at you. (In the rain, the wet paper added to this effect.)  I got the feeling that strength and perseverance were being birthed right out of the bricks.

Musical Artist: Ganucheau

 

ART on STREETS: Swoon in the Mission | Untapped SF

Title: Air*

 

Hampshire Street and 24th Street [Map]

via ART on STREETS: Swoon in the Mission | Untapped SF.

Enhanced by Zemanta

Banksys and beyond

 

[layout show=”3″] World famous Banksy has graced San Francisco with at least

6 of his works. You can see them posted here: http://bit.ly/All_6_SF_Banksys.

BRISTOL, ENGLAND - AUGUST 19:  A graffiti arti...

Banksy in Bristol Image by Getty Images via @daylif

But what about his other works? Originally, from England,

he must have several graffitis and stencils there.

Here is some of his work, with links and credits given, of course.

 

From Wikipedia

Banksy is a pseudonymous England-based graffiti artist, political activist, film director, and painter.

His satirical street art and subversive epigrams combine irreverent dark humour with graffiti done in a distinctive stencilling technique. Such artistic works of political and social commentary have been featured on streets, walls, and bridges of cities throughout the world.[1]

Banksy’s work was born out of the Bristol underground scene which involved collaborations between artists and musicians.[2] According to author and graphic designer Tristan Manco and the book Home Sweet Home, Banksy “was born in 1974 and raised in Bristol, England.[3] The son of a photocopier technician, he trained as a butcher but became involved in graffiti during the great Bristol aerosol boom of the late 1980s.”[4] Observers have noted that his style is similar to Blek le Rat, who began to work with stencils in 1981 in Paris and members of the anarcho-punk band Crass, which maintained a graffiti stencil campaign on the London Tube System in the late 1970s and early 1980s and is active today.[5][6][7] However Banksy himself stated on his website [8] that in all actuality he based his work on that of 3D from Massive Attack, stating, “No, I copied 3D from Massive Attack. He can actually draw.”

Known for his contempt for the government in labeling graffiti as vandalism, Banksy displays his art on public surfaces such as walls and even going as far as to build physical prop pieces. Banksy does not sell photos of street graffiti directly himself;[9][10] however, art auctioneers have been known to attempt to sell his street art on location and leave the problem of its removal in the hands of the winning bidder.[11] Banksy’s first film, Exit Through the Gift Shop, billed as “the world’s first street art disaster movie,” made its debut at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival.[12] The film was released in the UK on 5 March 2010.[13] In January 2011, he was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Documentary for the film.

 EARLY CAREER


Stencil art by Banksy on Brick Lane, London.

Banksy in LEarly career (1992–2001)

Banksy began as a freehand graffiti artist 1990–1994[14] as one of Bristol’s DryBreadZ Crew (DBZ), with Kato and Tes.[15] He was inspired by local artists and his work was part of the larger Bristol underground scene with Nick Walker, Inkie and 3D.[16][17] From the start he used stencils as elements of his freehand pieces, too.[14] By 2000 he had turned to the art of stencilling after realizing how much less time it took to complete a piece. He claims he changed to stencilling whilst he was hiding from the police under a rubbish lorry, when he noticed the stencilled serial number[18] and by employing this technique, he soon became more widely noticed for his art around Bristol and London.[18]

Stencil on the waterline of The Thekla, an entertainment boat in central Bristol – (wider view). The image of Death is based on a 19th century etching illustrating thepestilence of The Great Stink.[19]

 

Banksy art in Brick LaneEast End, 2004.

[edit]£10 notes to Barely Legal (2004–06)

In August 2004, Banksy produced a quantity of spoof British £10 notes substituting the picture of the Queen’s head with Diana, Princess of Wales’s head and changing the text “Bank of England” to “Banksy of England.” Someone threw a large wad of these into a crowd at Notting Hill Carnival that year, which some recipients then tried to spend in local shops. These notes were also given with invitations to a Santa’s Ghetto exhibition by Pictures on Walls. The individual notes have since been selling on eBay for about £200 each. A wad of the notes were also thrown over a fence and into the crowd near the NME signing tent at The Reading Festival. A limited run of 50 signed posters containing ten uncut notes were also produced and sold by Pictures on Walls for £100 each to commemorate the death of Princess Diana. One of these sold in October 2007 at Bonhams auction house in London for £24,000.

A stencil of Charles Manson in a prison suit, hitchhiking to anywhere, Archway, London

ISRAELI WEST BANK 2005

In August 2005, Banksy, on a trip to the Palestinian territories, created nine images on the Israeli West Bank wall.[25]

Graffiti paintings on the Israeli West Bank ba...

Banksy in Israeli West Ban Image via Wikipedia

photography of a Banksy graffiti at the Israel...

Banksy in Israeli West Bank Image via Wikipedia

Banksy held an exhibition called Barely Legal, billed as a “three day vandalised warehouse extravaganza” in Los Angeles, on the weekend of 16 September 2006. The exhibition featured a live “elephant in a room,” painted in a pink and gold floral wallpaper pattern, which, according to leaflets handed out at the exhibition, was intended to draw attention to the issue of world poverty. Although the Animal Services Department had issued a permit for the elephant, after complaints from animal rights activists, the elephant appeared unpainted on the final day. Its owners rejected claims of mistreatment and said that the elephant had done “many, many movies. She’s used to makeup.”[26] Banksy also made artwork displaying Queen Victoria as a lesbian and satirical pieces that incorporated art made by Andy Warhol and Leonardo da Vinci.[27]

The Banksy effect (2006–07)

After Christina Aguilera bought an original of Queen Victoria as a lesbian and two prints for £25,000,[28] on 19 October 2006 a set of Kate Moss paintings sold in Sotheby’sLondon for £50,400, setting an auction record for Banksy’s work. The six silk-screen prints, featuring the model painted in the style of Andy Warhol‘s Marilyn Monroepictures, sold for five times their estimated value. His stencil of a green Mona Lisa with real paint dripping from her eyes sold for £57,600 at the same auction.[29] In December, journalist Max Foster coined the phrase, “the Banksy effect,” to illustrate how interest in other street artists was growing on the back of Banksy’s success.[30]

Naked Man image by Banksy, on the wall of a sexual health clinic[31] in Park Street, Bristol. Following popular support, the City Council has decided it will be allowed to remain – (wider view).

On 21 February 2007, Sotheby’s auction house in London auctioned three works, reaching the highest ever price for a Banksy work at auction: over £102,000 for his Bombing Middle England. Two of his other graffiti works, Balloon Girl and Bomb Hugger, sold for £37,200 and £31,200 respectively, which were well above their estimated prices.[32] The following day’s auction saw a further three Banksy works reach soaring prices: Ballerina with Action Man Parts reached £96,000; Glory sold for £72,000; Untitled (2004) sold for £33,600; all significantly above estimated values.[33] To coincide with the second day of auctions, Banksy updated his website with a new image of an auction house scene showing people bidding on a picture that said, “I Can’t Believe You Morons Actually Buy This Shit.”[34] In February 2007, the owners of a house with a Banksy mural on the side in Bristol decided to sell the house through Red Propeller art gallery after offers fell through because the prospective buyers wanted to remove the mural. It is listed as a mural that comes with a house attached.[35]

 2008

Banksy “Swinger” in New Orleans

In March, a stencilled graffiti work appeared on Thames Water tower in the middle of the Holland Park roundabout, and it was widely attributed to Banksy. It was of a child painting the tag “Take this Society” in bright orange. London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham spokesman, Councillor Greg Smith branded the art as vandalism, and ordered its immediate removal, which was carried out by H&F council workmen within three days.[46] Over the weekend 3–5 May in London, Banksy hosted an exhibition called The Cans Festival. It was situated on Leake Street, a road tunnel formerly used by Eurostar underneath London Waterloo station. Graffiti artists with stencils were invited to join in and paint their own artwork, as long as it did not cover anyone else’s.[47] Artists included Blek le Rat, Broken Crow, C215, Cartrain, Dolk, Dotmasters, J.Glover, Ben Eine, Eelus, Hero, Pure evil, Jef AérosolMr Brainwash, Tom Civil Roadsworth and Sten & Lex.[citation needed]

Work on building in the Lower 9th Wardof New Orleans, August 2008

In late August 2008, marking the third anniversary of Hurricane Katrina and the associated levee failure disaster, Banksy produced a series of works in New Orleans, Louisiana, mostly on buildings derelict since the disaster.[48] A stencil painting attributed to Banksy appeared at a vacant petrol station in the Ensley neighbourhood of Birmingham, Alabama on 29 August as Hurricane Gustav approached the New Orleans area. The painting depicting a hooded member of the Ku Klux Klan hanging from a noose was quickly covered with black spray paint and later removed altogether.[49] His first official exhibition in New York, the “Village Pet Store And Charcoal Grill,” opened 5 October 2008. The animatronic pets in the store window include a mother hen watching over her baby Chicken McNuggets as they peck at a barbecue sauce packet, and a rabbit putting makeup on in a mirror.[50]

 

Exit Through the Gift Shop (2010)

The world premiere of the film Exit Through the Gift Shop occurred at the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah, on 24 January. He created 10 street pieces around Park City and Salt Lake City to tie in with the screening.[63] In February, The Whitehouse public house in Liverpool, England, was sold for £114,000 at auction.[64] The side of the building has an image of a giant rat by Banksy.[65] In March 2010, the work “Forgive us our Trespassing” was displayed in the London underground. The work had to be displayed without the halo over the boy’s head. After a few days the halo was repainted and the poster was removed by Tube advertising bosses. The display was organised by Art Below, a London based public art agency. In April 2010, Melbourne City Council in Australia reported that they had inadvertently ordered private contractors to paint over the last remaining Banksy art in the city. The image was of a rat descending in a parachute adorning the wall of an old council building behind the Forum Theatre. In 2008, vandals had poured paint over a stencil of an old-fashioned diver wearing a trenchcoat. A council spokeswoman has said they would now rush through retrospective permits to protect other “famous or significant artworks” in the city.[66] In April 2010, to coincide with the premiere of Exit Through the Gift Shop in San Francisco, five of his pieces appeared in various parts of the city.[67] Banksy reportedly paid a San Francisco Chinatown building owner $50 for the use of their wall for one of his stencils.[68] In early May 2010, seven new Banksy pieces appeared in Toronto, Ontario, Canada,[69] though most have been subsequently painted over or removed. In May 2010, to coincide with the premiere of Exit Through the Gift Shop in Royal Oak, Banksy visited the Detroit area and left his mark in several places in Detroit and Warren.[70] Shortly after the Detroit piece showing a little boy holding a can of red paint next to the words “I remember when all this was trees” was excavated by the 555 Nonprofit Gallery and Studios. They claim that they do not intend to sell the work but plan to preserve it and display it at their Detroit gallery.[71] There was also an attempted removal of one of the Warren pieces known as “Diamond Girl.”[72]

In late January 2011, Exit Through the Gift Shop was nominated for a 2010 Oscar for Best Documentary Feature.[73] Banksy released a statement about the nomination, where he said, “This is a big surprise… I don’t agree with the concept of award ceremonies, but I’m prepared to make an exception for the ones I’m nominated for. The last time there was a naked man covered in gold paint in my house, it was me.”[74] Leading up to the Oscars, Banksy blanketed Los Angeles with street art. Many people speculated if Banksy would show up at the Oscars in disguise and make a surprise appearance if he won the Oscar. Exit Through the Gift Shop did not win the award, which went to Inside Job. In early March 2011, Banksy responded to the Oscars with an art piece in Weston, UK, of a little girl holding the Oscar and pouting. Many people think the piece is in reference to 15-month old Lara, who dropped and damaged her father’s (The King’s Speech co-producer Simon Egan) Oscar statue.[75] Exit Through the Gift Shop was broadcast on British public television station Channel 4 on 13 August 2011.

Banksy was also credited with the opening couch gag for the 2010 The Simpsons episode “MoneyBART,” depicting people working in deplorable conditions and using endangered or mythical animals to make both the episodes cel-by-cel and the merchandise connected with the program.[76] His name appears several times throughout the episode’s opening sequence, spray-painted on assorted walls and signs.

[edit]2011

In May 2011 Banksy released a lithographic print which showed a smoking petrol bomb contained in a ‘Tesco Value’ bottle. This followed a long running campaign by locals against the opening of a Tesco Express supermarket in Banksy’s home city of Bristol. Violent clashes had taken place between police and demonstrators in the Stokes Croft area. Banksy produced the poster ostensibly to raise money for local groups in the Stokes Croft area and to raise money for the legal defence of those arrested during the riots. The posters were sold exclusively at the Bristol Anarchists Bookfair in Stokes Croft for £5 each.[77]

In December, he unveiled “Cardinal Sin” at the Walker Art Gallery, Liverpool. The bust, which replaces a priest’s face with a “pixelated” effect, was a statement on the child abuse scandal in the Catholic church[78]

[edit]2012

In early 2012, Banksy finished his first book titled: ‘You Are an Acceptable Level of Threat.’ The book will be published by Carpet Bombing Culture, and has a official release date of July 2, 2012 [79]

[edit]

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

SF Graffiti Art: Banksy Artwork Dots the City

One nation under CCTV. "Banksy art is gra...

Banksy in England Image via Wikipedia

Originating from the UK, famous, admired, despised (and wanted) street artistBanksy has left mark(s) in many cities around the world. With the recent opening of controversial documentary Exit Through The Gift Shop revealing Banksy‘s life of art and crime, its limited release in select US cities may have facilitated the artist visiting each major city the film opened in to leave a Banksy piece at the time of each opening. On the West CoastLos Angeles got a coupleSeattle allegedly received at least one, and locals estimate that San Francisco was hit six times.

Banksy has a lot of fans in San Francisco — as the pieces appeared, people who spotted them expressed both excitement and delight. We’re sure the property owners may not feel the same way (unless they “monetize it” like this man in London did, capitalizing on the worth of a Banksy as fetched by art collectors).

On Thursday April 22, Kat Cuffe caught the Chinatown piece, while Rebecca Morehiser shot it when the paint was still wet (9:33 AM) — the find was officially broken by Warholian, who has extensive Banksy SF coverage. At the same time across The City in the Mission,Erin Archuleta got to work only to be surprised by a fresh Banksy across the street from her office at Valencia and 20th, and got the first post up.

 

Friday April 23rd saw Scott Rafer finding the “Native American” Banksy (again in the Mission) on the side of Cafe Prague on Sycamore. Meanwhile, SOMA residents and workers awoke to a new Banksy at 9th and Howarddiscovered by Jean Hackman. The last two were collectively found: all were photographed beautifully in this Flickr set by Thomas Hawk. Each new SF Banksy has been named, mapped and documented here in great detail by Warholian Pics (video via).

 

 

 

Enhanced by Zemanta

Interview with San Francisco Oil on Glass Painter, Musician, Artist "Duke"

Internet Radio interview with San Francisco artist, commonly found in Dolores Park, Pacific Heights or oGolden Gate Park selling or creating his contemporary, unique and beautiful  his oil on glass paintings. The subject matter is almost always exclusively San Francisco subjects and the glass that he paints on are actually windows taken out of old San Francisco homes.

 DUKE; Painter/Musician famous for painting 

on San Francisco’s “PINK LADIES!” windows; talks with JUDY JOY JONES! One of fourteen children, DUKE was born in Louisville, KY, & rounds out his painting career by playing music in Bay Area Clubs as well as painting “PINK Listen to internet radio with Judy Joy Jones Show on Blog Talk Radio

 

Interview withDuke Pink LadiesDuke nude woman use it

DukeDuke painting windowuse

Oil on Glass San Francisco Artist "DUKE"



Enhanced by Zemanta

Jeremy Novy LGBTQ Graffiti Artist

A Movement Defaced: Queer Street Art Fights for Legitimacy

A A AComments (35)By Jonathan Curiel Wednesday, Jun 15 2011

image
Cover photo by Michael Cuffe/Warholian.

Inside his art studio in San Francisco’s Bayview District, Jeremy Novy surrounds himself with the stencilwork that has burnished his reputation as a street artist of note. Of course, the koi are there. Even people who don’t know his name know his aquatic vertebrates — colorful creatures that can be found on sidewalks across San Francisco, most prominently at Market and Laguna streets, where scores of the fish swirl outside the Orbit Room. In Novy’s studio, though, the animals are crowded out by representations of people. Men, mostly. Queer men like the drag queen with the yellow beehive and bright red panties, and the young wrestlers grabbing each other’s flesh. Then there’s the stencil of a big pink erect phallus.

“That’s my cock,” Novy says matter-of-factly.

The stylized erection has appeared on walls inside select San Francisco venues like the Stud, a gay South of Market bar at Ninth and Harrison streets, but Novy has a greater mission: to make queer-oriented street art and artists more visible. The mainstream, as it were.

Kelly Nicolaisen

Kelly Nicolaisen
Novy’s street-level appropriation of Warhol, as seen at SOMArts.

 

“Queer street art has always been an oppressed art form,” he says. “We are not taggers. We’re street artists. This is for social change. It’s about doing something better.”

A sign of Novy’s growing influence: A new exhibit he organized and curated received indirect funding from the National Endowment for the Arts and the San Francisco Arts Commission. “A History of Queer Street Art,” on display through June 25 at SOMArts, features gay, bisexual, lesbian, transgender, and a few straight street artists from around the world who — like Novy — are plastering public spaces with in-your-face imagery with overt gay or queer themes. The Los Angeles artist Homo Riot, for example, is known for his stencils of kissing bearded men.

These artists — most in their 20s, 30s, and early 40s — claim to be at the forefront of a new street-art movement that is centered in metropolitan areas in Europe and the United States, including San Francisco. Their work, they say, is fighting homophobia.

“I’m really doing it to communicate, predominantly with gay men, that we’re out there and we can be bold and we can be visible, and that’s okay, and that’s a good thing,” says Homo Riot, who signs his work with the moniker B A Homo. He also argues that his work carries a message to heterosexuals: “Don’t take us for granted. Don’t belittle us. We’re out here, and we could be on your street corner, and we’re about this far from taking to the streets and causing trouble.”

“Trouble” is what authorities say these artists are already causing. “The official position of the Arts Commission is that we’re against tagging and the placing of artwork on surfaces without the permission of the property owner,” says Luis Cancel, the commission’s director of cultural affairs and a former director of the Bronx Museum of the Arts. “We don’t condone this at all.” He says millions of dollars are spent every year to rid city properties of graffiti, tags, and other unwelcome additions.

But the artists in “A History of Queer Street Art” can say their work is both legal and illegal. Novy puts his art legally on some city spaces (such as the Orbit Room) and illegally on other spaces (as a SOMA billboard that months ago was stenciled with Novy’s bodybuilders). The artists say their illegal work is necessary to make their message visible to a wider audience.

The show at SOMArts is part of this wider campaign, but the Arts Commission does not necessarily condone Novy’s exhibition, whose racier images include a sticker in the style of a street sign showing a man giving a rim job. The Arts Commission awarded monies to San Francisco’s Queer Cultural Center for its “Creating Queer Community” campaign; in turn, the center funded Novy’s exhibit, which opened June 4 as part of its annual National Queer Arts Festival. The center also supported the exhibition through a portion of a $10,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts — an agency with a history of art-funding controversies. Whether “A History of Queer Street Art” will number among these remains to be seen.


More About

Street art is dominated by straight men,” says Homo Riot, who came to San Francisco in January to festoon the Haight and Castro districts with stickers of his bearded kissers. “There’s a lot of misogynistic stuff that passes for street art. There are images of women in provocative setups; there’s tits and ass all over. As a gay man, and even as a young boy, I wanted to see images of men. That’s what I was attracted to. But in our culture, we have such taboo surrounding the penis and male sexuality that’s not directed at women.”

That taboo is evident when Homo Riot puts up his stencils in popular L.A. street-art spaces and within hours sees his work violently defaced. He says the attacks happen to a small but significant portion of his work. The men’s faces get Xed out or scratched off — which is hard to do, since he uses a special paste that adheres the work tightly. Still, he says, some straight street artists have given him “support and encouragement,” even lauding his kissing figures, who go by the name Homo Duo.

1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | Next Page >>

Enhanced by Zemanta