Category Archives: Museum Exhibits

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This Sunday, come Explore San Francisco and create some wonderful Mother’s Day memories to last a long time.

Take Mom out for a food tour and a cruise on the Bay for only $64!
Choose any of these food tours:

  • North Beach at Night
  • Mission Vegetarian
  • Little Saigon
  • Mission District South (24th Street)
  • The Real Chinatown

Paired with a Bay Cruise on San Francisco Bay!


To make reservations or for more information, please call:415.504.3636 x 102 or email: reservations@exploresf.bizLimited number of spots available
Golden Gate Bay CruiseOperated by:

Red and White Fleet

Give her the fun day she deserves
While making memories to last a lifetime

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Prague flower shop

Prague flower shop (Photo credit: jafsegal)

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Earthquake Premiere Party: California Academy of Sciences

 

 

EARTHQUAKE PREMIER PARTY

PARTY LIKE IT’S 1906!

 

…….Events + Lectures > Earthquake Premiere Party  Earthquake Premiere Party

 

 

 

………………………………………………………..
The view of downtown and Civic Center, City Hall still stands. after San Francisco’s 1906 quake.

 

Party like it’s 1906! Be the first to experience the brand new Earthquake exhibit and planetarium show. Revel in the atmosphere of the Barbary Coast, San Francisco’s most exciting era, with dancing, music, and cocktails.Earthquake Premiere PartyFriday, May 257:00 pm – Midnight ages 21+Travel back to a time when San Francisco was the ‘Paris of America.’ The largest port city in the West, it was rich in gold, industry, and culture and brimming with excitement, grit, beauty, and mischief. Experience a taste of the seedy Barbary Coast, brought to life through variety shows, art installations, roving characters, and live music provided by the Vau de Vire Society. Feel the awesome power of the Great Quake in an earthquake simulator, try a Pisco Punch or Martinez cocktail, and then dance the night away to the vintage sounds of the Sour Mash Hug Band.HighlightsBe the first to see the Earthquake exhibit and planetarium show. Get a glimpse before its public debut.Brace yourself with a new, visually stunning planetarium show that journeys through the San Andreas fault, delves into the Earth’s core, and explores the seismic science of earthquakes throughout our world.Costumes and period dress are encouraged! Find inspiration in fashion from the Steampunk, Edwardian, or Barbary Coast eras to show off your inner dandy. Strut your stuff in a fashion show and contest.Turn on the red light with titillating entertainment, including a vaudeville show, Can–Can dancers, and music by the John Brothers Piano Company.View an exclusive exhibit featuring photographs of San Francisco before and after the 1906 earthquake, and Academy specimens and archive materials saved from the ensuing fires. The Earthquake Premiere Party is for guests ages 21 and over. Ticket prices are per person.  Rupture Zone Package: $99 Space is limited!Rock the epicenter of the party!VIP Lounge from 7:00pm – 10:00pmEvent: 7:00pm – midnight ages 21+Hors d‘oeuvres and flowing bowl of Pisco Punch, provided by GreenCap Productions by Charles Phan, entertainment by Veronica Klaus and Vau de Vire Society, and two complimentary drinks.Admission to Premiere Party, including access to the Earthquake exhibit.Reserved planetarium show ticketsIncludes 9:30pm or 10:15 planetarium show ticketsTickets » Seismic Zone Tickets: Members $49/Non–Members $69Shake things up 1906–style!Event: 7:00pm – midnight ages 21+Admission to Premiere Party, including access to the Earthquake exhibit.Two complimentary drinksPlanetarium show tickets are not included. Show tickets are available for a $10 upgrade at check–out. Limited availabilityTickets »

via Earthquake Premiere Party: California Academy of Sciences.

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Kick Off Spring with These Three Art Shows | 7×7

Kick Off Spring with These Three Art Shows

Katharina Wulff, Die Verbindung (The Connection), 2008; oil on canvas;

48 1/16 x 68 7/8 in. (122 x 175 cm); Olbricht Collection; © Katharina

Wulff

The city’s museums now have their major exhibitions out and swinging (you’ve seen Foto Mexico and Gaultier; the ads plastered over town are maybe coaxing a return visit) and the gallery circuit is on the cusp of exploding into a big spring season. Our suggestion: take this weekend to explore some of the Bay’s slightly smaller, considerably less hyped, but no doubt equally fascinating museum shows. Here are three picks.

New Work: Katharina Wulff at SFMOMA

Katharina Wulff is unmistakably contemporary in how freely she channels the modern. Befitting for an institution that hangs the likes of Matisse and Dalí, Wulff’s whimsical and captivating paintings are at turns Fauvist, Surrealist and Dada. The whole of art history is the Moroccan-based artist’s playground.

Consisting of twenty works, this showing marks the artist’s first ever solo exhibition in the U.S., and, more importantly, her west coast debut. What can you expect? Much in the way of fantastical landscapes, confused perspective, bizarre-looking animals and still more bizarre-looking people. They brim with color and intrigue, never staying too long in any one place.

Katharina Wulff runs through September 4, 2012, at SFMOMA, 151 3rd Street

Modern Cartoonist: The Art of Daniel Clowes at Oakland Museum of California

Don’t call them comic books. The twenty first century graphic novel has elevated the panel-illustrated narrative to unprecedented heights. It’s been a thrilling and lucrative progression, and Oakland’s own Daniel Clowes has been at the forefront from the beginning. Some accounts would place this remarkably gifted illustrator, who has over fifty publications under his belt as well as an academy award nomination for screenplay, as the genre’s reigning patriarch.

The OMCA’s sprawling, installation-based show marks the first major survey of Clowe’s work to date. Complete with original drawings, artifacts and an extensive full-color monograph, this form of recognition is long overdue.

Modern Cartoonist runs through August 24, 2012, at Oakland Museum of California, 1000 Oak Street

Femmescapes at Mills College Art Museum

Femmescapes at Mills College Art Museum

A group of Mills College students were given a pretty amazing opportunity: to freely mine Lenore Pereira and Rich Niles’ marvelous collection of contemporary work by women artists. With names like Louise Bourgeois, Ann Hamilton and Francesca Woodman on the roster, this is a trove that many professional curators would probably kill for a chance to have at.

The resulting exhibition, Femmescapes, explores the various conceptual and metaphorical intertwinings of femininity and environment – nature as a woman, woman as land (lush, fertile, barren, etc.), body as landscape. Featuring about 40 works of painting, video, photography and sculpture, this is a unique glimpse not to be missed.

Femmescapes is on view Saturdays and Sundays only, through May 6, at 70 South Park

via Kick Off Spring with These Three Art Shows | 7×7.

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What's happening today: Saturday, April 21, 2012 Sf Gate, Bay Guardian, Gay Cities Events

What’s happening today: Saturday, April 21, 2012

There is a lot happening today.

Deep Green Festival

A CELEBRATION OF CANNABIS, HEALTH & ECOLOGY

Not your average stoner gathering, the Deep Green Fest focuses on the utility of hemp as an economic andenvironmental resource. Political activists take note: a full day’s worth of lectures on cannabis policy is on tap, as well as 215 smoking areas and tons of smoke- friendly live jams on the numerous stages. noon-midnight, $12–$25 festival-only; $60–$75 conference admission.  Craneway Pavilion, 1414 Harbour, Richmond. (510) 735-1133, http://www.deepgreenfest.com

Cesar Chavez Festival– For too many of us, Cesar Chavez Day passes by in a blur of I’m-not-at-work (or dammit-I’m-at-work) chaos. We don’t really stop to celebrate the man, and that’s a shame because as you can tell from the way Rainbow Grocery shuts its door to celebrate him, he was a seminal figure in California history, Chicano history, and labor movement history. Luckily, we all get a hall pass this and every year if we didn’t observe the man on his state-sanctioned holiday. Today, the Mission will be marked by a parade in his honor, leading to a street fair on 24th Street with live music by Carlos Santana’s son Salvador, local hip-hop phenom Bang Data, and the Cuicacalli Youth Ballet Folklorico, among many other acts. 11am parade; noon-6pm fair, free Street fair: 24th St. between Bryant and Treat, SF (415) 621-2665, http://www.cesarchavezday.org

San Francisco Cherry Blossom Festival Today, 220,000 Attendees expected.

Today, Saturday, Apr 21 10:00a to 7:00p
at San Francisco Cherry Blossom FestivalSan FranciscoCA
Price: FREE to attend
Phone: (415) 563-2313
Age Suitability: All Ages

This year’s Northern California Cherry Blossom Festival will be held on Saturday and Sunday April 14-15 and April 21-22, 2012. All are welcome to join in the festivities as we celebrate Japanese and Japanese American culture in San Francisco’s Japantown! The festival will be held on Post Street between Laguna and Fillmore Streets. There will be food booths, cultural performances, martial arts, live bands, the annual Queen Program, and more. The Grand Parade will be held on April 22, beginning at City Hall and concluding in Japantown. The Northern California Cherry Blossom Festival is said to be the second largest festival outside of Washington, D.C. to celebrate the blooming of cherry blossoms; and held at one of three remaining Japantowns in the United States.

Steve Silver’s Beach Blanket Babylon

Today, Saturday, Apr 21 6:30p
at Club Fugazi, San Francisco, CA
The always-changing Steve Silver’s Beach Blanket Babylon is the world’s longest running musical revue. Packed with hilarious spoofs of pop culture & political characters, outrageously gigantic hats and one show-stopping number after another, the show continues to dazzle audiences at Club Fugazi in San Francisco’s North Beach district. read more
Categories: ComedyMusicals

Berkeley Dance Project 20122

Today, Saturday, Apr 21 8:00p
Three new choreographic works explore the theme of transformation. Amara Tabor-Smith will use the Sabar dance form as a metaphor for personal growth and cultural shifts; Stephanie Sherman will explore assimilation using costumes to challenge traditional ideas of identity; and Lisa Wymore will experiment with ritual and heightened physical states. read more
Categories: DancePerforming Arts

via San Francisco Bay Guardian | News, Politics, Music, Arts, Culture.

 

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The Naked and Famous

Today, Saturday, Apr 21 9:00p
at The Warfield, San Francisco, CA
The Naked and Famous New Zealand indie electronic ensemble the Naked and Famous make driving, melodic pop with an ’80s post-punk influence. Centered around the talents of vocalist Alisa Xayalith and instrumentalist/vocalist Thom Powers, the band formed in 2008 and released two EPs before adding members to play live….
Monty Pythons Spamalot Monty Pythons Spamalot 
The funniest show on earth is back to taunt San Francisco for a second time! Winner …
4/21/2012 Saturday 2:00p Orpheum Theatre, San Francisco CA
Featuring:  Monty Python’s Spamalot

Bill Bellamy  Bill Bellamy

4/21/2012 Saturday 9:30p Cobb’s Comedy Club, San Francisco CA
Featuring: Bill Bellamy

4th Annual Goat Festival  4th Annual Goat Festival

A Celebration of All Things Goat! – co-hosted by CUESA.org (the Center for Urban Education about Sustainable Agriculture) …

4/21/2012 Saturday 10:00a to 1:00p Ferry Plaza Farmer’s Market, San Francisco CA

Thats What She Said! That’s What She Said!

That’s What She Said is a variety show full of awesome women. This show features … 4/21/2012 Saturday 7:30p The Garage, San Francisco CA
Featuring: Caitlin Gill

The Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the CatwalkThe Fashion World of Jean Paul Gaultier: From the Sidewalk to the Catwalk

Dubbed fashion’s enfant terrible, Jean Paul Gaultier launched his first prêt-à-porter …

4/21/2012 Saturday 9:30a to 5:15p
de Young Museum, San Francisco CA
  The Caretaker The Caretaker
The Caretaker – first performed in 1960 – was Harold Pinter’s first big hit. Fifty …

4/21/2012 Saturday 2:00p
Curran Theatre, San Francisco CA
Featuring: Jonathan Pryce
NPRs Says You! NPR’s Says You!
Host Richard Sher and hilarious panelists Barry Nolan, Francine Achbar, Tony Kahn …

4/21/2012 Saturday 2:00p
Jewish Community Center of San Francisco, San Francisco CA

Gay San Francisco Happenings Today Saturday 21, 2012

 

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The Mission District

THE MISSION DISTRICT

Neighborhood Profile

Liberty HIll

 

Location: The principal thoroughfare of the Mission District of San Francisco is Mission Street. Its borders are U.S. Route 101 to the east which forms the boundary between the eastern portion of the district, known as “Inner Mission” and its eastern neighbor, Potrero Hill, while Sanchez Street separates the neighborhoods from Eureka Valley (also known as “The Castro”) and Noe Valley to the west. The part of the neighborhood from Valencia Street to Sanchez Street, north of 20th, is known as Mission Dolores. South of 20th towards 22nd, and between Valencia and Dolores Streets is a distinct sub-neighborhood known as Liberty Hill.[3] Cesar Chavez Street (formerly Army Street) is the southern border which lies next to Bernal Heights, while to the north the neighborhood is separated fromSouth of Market roughly by Duboce Avenue and the elevated highway of the Central Freeway which runs above 13th Street. Also along Mission Street, further south-central are the Excelsior and Crocker-Amazon neighborhoods, sometimes referred to as the “Outer Mission” (not to be confused with the actual Outer Mission neighborhood). The Mission District is part of San Francisco’s supervisorial districts 6, 9 and 10.

 

Climate

The microclimates of San Francisco create a system by which each neighborhood can have radically different weather at any given time. The Mission’s geographical location insulates it from the fog and wind from the west. As a result, the Mission has a tendency to be warmer and sunnier than the rest of the city. This climatic phenomenon becomes apparent to visitors who walk downhill from 24th Street in the west from Noe Valley (where clouds from Twin Peaks in the west tend to accumulate on foggy days) towards Mission Street in the east, partly because Noe Valley is on higher ground whereas the Inner Mission is at a lower elevation.[4]

 

History Prior to 1900

Pioneer Race Course 1853, the grandstands shown were located just south of 24th and Shotwell St.

 

 

 

 

The Yelamu Indians inhabited the region that is now known as the Mission District for over 2,000 years. Spanish missionaries arrived in the area during the late 18th century. They found these people living in two villages on Mission Creek. It was here that a Spanish priest named Father Francisco Palóu founded Mission San Francisco de Asis on June 29, 1776. The Mission was moved from the shore of Laguna Dolores to its current location in 1783.[5] Franciscan friars are reported to have used Ohlone slave labor to complete the Mission in 1791.[6] This period marked the beginning of the end of the Yelamu culture. The Indian population

Deanza

De Anza at Lake Dolores?

at Mission Dolores dropped from 400 to 50 between 1833 and 1841. Ranchos owned by Spanish-Mexican families such as the Valenciano, Guerrero, Dolores, Bernal, Noé and De Harocontinued in the area, separated from the town of Yerba Buena, later renamed San Francisco (centered around Portsmouth Square) by a two mile wooden plank road (later paved and renamed Mission Street).

 

 

 

Lake Dolores

Lake Dolores Marker, Albion Street

The lands around the nearly abandoned mission church became a focal point of raffish attractions[7] including bull and bear fighting, horse racing, baseball and dueling. A famous beer parlor resort known as The Willows was located along Mission Creek just south of 18th Street between Mission Street and San Carlos Street.[8] From 1865 to 1891 a large conservatory and zoo known as Woodward’s Gardens was located along the west side of Mission Street between 13th and 15th Streets.[9] In the decades after the Gold Rush, the town of San Francisco quickly expanded, and the Mission lands were developed and subdivided into housing plots for working class immigrants, largely German, Irish and Italian,[7] and also for industrial uses.

 

Professional Baseball

As the city grew in the decades following the Gold Rush, the Mission District became home to the first professional baseball stadium in California, opened in 1868 and known asRecreation Grounds seating 17,000 people which was located at Folsom and 25th Streets, a portion of the grounds remain as present day Garfield Square.[10] Also, in the 20th century, the Mission District was home to two other baseball stadiums, Recreation Park located at 14th and Valencia and Seals Stadium located at 16th and Bryant with both these stadiums being used by the baseball team named after the Mission District known as the Mission Reds and the San Francisco Seals.

 

Ethnicity trends

During European settlement of the City in the 19th and 20th century, large numbers of Irish and German immigrant workers moved into the area. Development and settlement intensified after the 1906 earthquake, as many displaced businesses and residents moved into the area, making Mission Street a major commercial thoroughfare. In 1926, the Polish Community of San Francisco converted a church on 22nd Street and Shotwell Street and opened its doors as the Polish Club of San Francisco, referred to today as the “Dom Polski”, or Polish Home. The Irish American community made their mark during this time, with notable people like etymologist Peter Tamony calling the Mission home. During the 1940-1960s, large numbers ofMexican immigrants moved into the area, initiating white flight, giving the Mission the Latin character it is known for today. During the 1980s and into the 1990s, the neighborhood received a higher influx of immigrants and refugees from Central and South America fleeing civil wars and political instability at the time. These immigrants brought in many Central American banks and companies which would set up branches, offices, and regional headquarters on Mission Street.

 

Recent historyWomen's Building

In the late 1970s and early 1980s the Valencia Street corridor had a lively punk night life with several clubs including The Offensive, The Deaf Club and Valencia Tool & Die and the former fire station on 16th Street, called the Compound, sported what was commonly referred to as “the punk mall”, an establishment that catered to punk style and culture. On South Van Ness, Target Video and Damage Magazine were located in a three-story warehouse. The neighborhood was dubbed “the New Bohemia” by the San Francisco Chronicle in 1995.

Since at least the 1980s, a wave of gang affiliation appeared in the Mission. Branches of the Sureño and Norteño gangs settled in and engaged in criminal activities and open violence over territorial boundaries in the neighborhood, northwest and southeast respectively.[11] Also, the notorious international gang MS-13 who was originated in LA,become active at the time. Although during the late 1990s and into the 2000s gang prevention programs, including a 2007 injunction,  have attempted to reduce the associated violence from these gangs, these kind of activities still continue to be a persistent problem for the neighborhood, resulting in uncomfortable socio-economic overlaps of a neighborhood in transition.

 

Hipster Central

Mission HipsterFollowing that decade in the late 1990s and into the 2010s, and especially during the dot-com boomyoung urban professionals, to twentysomethings and thirtysomethings living thehipster lifestyle moved into the area, initiating gentrification, and raising rent and housing prices, with a number of Latino middle-class families as well as artists moving to the Outer Mission area, or out of the city entirely to the suburbs of East Bay and South Bay area. Despite rising rent and housing prices, many Mexican and Central American immigrants continue to reside in the Mission, although the neighborhood’s high rents and home prices have led to the Latino population dropping by 20% over the last decade. Most recently, the Mission has a reputation of being edgy and artsy.

 

 

Landmarks and Features

Alta California missionMission San Francisco de Asis, the namesake of the neighborhood, and the oldest building in the city located in the far western end of the neighborhood on Dolores Street.

 

 

 

 

 

Roxie Theater, 16th Street and Valencia Street

The Armory

The Armory
The Armory and kink.com

 

 

 

 

Mission Mural

Mission Mural

 

 

 Murals

 

Throughout the Mission walls and fences are decorated with murals initiated by the Chicano Art Mural Movement of the 197 and inspired by the traditional Mexican paintings made famous by Diego Rivera.

Banksy

Banksy

Street Murals and paintings of Latin American culture by local artists are a common feature and attraction.

 

There are even a couple very coveted works by Banksy in the Mission valued in the tens of thousands.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mission Mural

Mission Mural

 

Murals of some size adorn almost every block in The Mission. Usually the murals are not tagged by local graffiti artists.

 

 

 

 

 

Some of the more significant mural installations are located on Balmy Alley, and Clarion Alley.

floral house

floral house

 

Dead

Day of the Dead


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Mission District’s annual Day of the Dead celebration is not to be missed, Garfield Square. This nighttime parade and celebration now attracts thousands, if not tens of thousands of participants.

 

"Gay Beach", Dolores Park

"Gay Beach", Dolores Park

 

Hipsters in Dolores Park

Hipsters in Dolores Park

 

Dolores Park– A thriving social location where people congregate to explore and create expressions of art, dance, music, and fashion. The Mission provides the city of San Francisco with some of it’s sunniest weather and also a wide array of fantastic restaurants and chic clothing boutiques. It offers a beautiful view of the city and brings a friendly and diverse people together.

Dolores Park is the perfect park in the city to spend a sunny Saturday afternoon with friends-just ride your fixed gear bike on over and set up a picnic blanket, pack a couple of cold brews and your Bi-Rite sandwich or a Blue Bottle Coffee and you’re all set to enjoy a great time. Oh yeah, and don’t forget to bring your doggie!
Mission Hipster Influence

The ‘Mish’  The neighborhoods old nickname makes a comeback

The “hot-spot” to be right now in the ‘Mish’ is Dolores Park where mostly young hipsters and members of the gay community congregate to enjoy this beautiful Park. People here are socially and culturally expressing themselves creatively in different ways through clothing, sexuality, politics, music, art, bikes, hair, even shoes. Some of the “hot” things in right now in Dolores are…..

 

Bikes
To call yourself a true hipster you must have a fixed-gear bicycle also known as a ‘Fixie’ or an old vintage bike to mash around the City in. The grass at Dolores Park is packed with finely painted Fixies with neon colored bike wheels and an attitude that shows off, “I’m cool, I ride a Fixie.” To get your bike fixed up, head on over to Valencia Cyclery and then hit the City!

 

Mission Hipster Music

On a beautiful day in Dolores, musicians come together to jam on the bongos and guitar. Local bands sometimes set up their sets and rock out for people to enjoy. Up on “Gay Beach” where most of the gay community likes to congregate, DJ’s set up tables where they spin house and electronic music, getting everyone in the party groove. Down on “Hipster Hill” the Capoeiera Brazilian Martial Arts crew is usually playing their instruments while players kick, jump, and pull out cool break-dancing moves.

Most hipsters in Dolores are avid listeners and blog followers of Indie-Rock bands and the latest hype around Electronic music. Here is some of the music that people here enjoy-
-Phoenix
-The xx
-Ratatat
-Gorillaz
-Neon Indian
-Fever Ray
-The Morning Benders
-Kings of Leon
-Bob Dylan

The Mission’s nightlife is alive and full of an eclectic mix of music and local IPA brews. Some of the most popular bars to hit up while visiting are the Elbo Room, Beauty Bar, Thieves Tavern, Delerium, El Rio, The Knockout-real hipsters out here…Some other classic Mission bars-
-Zeitgeist
-Make-out Room
-Dalva
-Amnesia

Mission Hipster Fashion

Here are some of the most popular fashions that are alive in The Mission-

-American Apparel
-Skinny and tight jean
-Ray Ban
-Scruffy hairdues and long mustaches on guys
-Girls with edgy bangs, hair usually long and dark or bleach blonde, very ‘Mod’
-Leather jackets
-Toms shoes
-Frye Boot
-Chrome messenger bag
-Timbuk2 bags

Be sure to hit up the vintage clothing store Schauplatz Clothing where you will find a mix of everything we call ‘Hipster.’

Although gentrification during the 1990s and 2000s shifted the demographics and culture of the neighborhood, to account for a large younger, more White American, the Mission remains the cultural nexus and epicenter of San Francisco’s, and to a lesser extent, the Bay Area’s Latino, ChicanoNicaraguan Salvadorian and Guatemalan community. While Mexican, Salvadorian, and other Latin American businesses are pervasive throughout the neighborhood, residences are not evenly distributed. Most of the neighborhood’s Hispanic residents live on the eastern and southern sides. The western and northern sides of the neighborhood are more affluent and less diverse.


 

Food

The Mission district is also famous and influential for its restaurants. Dozens of Taquerías are located throughout the neighborhood, showcasing a localized styling of Mexican food and is the original home of the San Francisco burrito.[21]There are also a high concentration of Salvadorean, Guatemalan, Nicaraguan, restaurants there as well as a large number of street food vendors.[22] In the last couple decades a number of high caliber of multi-ethnic specialty restaurants have gained national attention, most notably the Michelin two-star rated French restaurant Sai’son on Folsom Street. A large number of other restaurants are also popular, including: Mission Chinese Food and Foreign Cinema on Mission Street, Delfina on 18th and Almathe Slated Door and Luna Park on Valencia.[23][24]

Art scene

Due to the existing cultural attractions, less expensive housing and commercial space, and the high density of restaurants and drinking establishments, the Mission is a magnet for young people. An independent arts community also arose and, since the 1990s, the area has been home to the Mission School art movement. Many studios, galleries, performance spaces, and public art projects are located in the Mission, including the Project ArtaudFirst ExposuresSouthern ExposureArt Explosion StudiosArtist XchangeArtists’ Television Access, and the oldest, alternative, not-for profit art space in the city of San Francisco, Intersection for the ArtsThe Roxie Theater, the oldest continuously-operating movie theater in San Francisco, is host to repertory and independent films as well as local film festivals. Poets, musicians, emcees, and other artists sometimes gather on the southwest corner of the 16th & Mission intersection to perform.[25]

Numerous Latino artistic and cultural institutions are based in the Mission. The Mission Cultural Center for the Latino Arts, established by Latino artists and activists, is an art space. The local bilingual newspaper, El Tecolote, was founded in 1970. The Mission’s Galería de la Raza, founded by local artists active in el Movimiento (the Chicano civil rights moment), is a nationally recognized arts organization. Late May, the city’s annual Carnaval festival and parade marches down Mission Street. Meant to mimic the festival in Rio de Janeiro, it is held in late May instead of the traditional late February to take advantage of better weather.

Artists

Some well-known artists associated with the Mission District include:

Music Scene

The Mission is rich in musical groups and performances. Roving Mariachi bands play in restaurants throughout the district, especially in the restaurants congregated around Valencia and Mission in the northeast portion of the district. Carlos Santanaspent his teenage years in the Mission, graduating from Mission High School in 1965. He has often returned to the neighborhood, including for a live concert with his band Santana that was recorded in 1969,[44] and for the KQEDdocumentary “The Mission” filmed in 1994.[45]

The locally-inspired song “Mission in the Rain” by Robert Hunter and Jerry Garcia appeared on Garcia’s solo album“Reflections”, and was played by the Grateful Dead five times in concert in 1976.[46]

Classical music is heard in the concert hall of the Community Music Center on Capp Street.[47]

Elbo Room, a bar/live music venue on Valencia Street, is home to Dub Mission, a weekly reggae/dub party started in 1996 byDJ Sep and over the years has brought many luminaries of reggae and dub music to perform there.

The Mission District is also very popular for its influencing Hip-Hop/Rap music scene. Record labels like Black N Brown/ Thizz Latin and Hometeam Ent. help put Mission District rappers, like Goldtoes, mousie, Gangsta Flea, Mr. Kee, Friscasso, 10sion, The Goodfelonz, and Don Louis & Colicious, get exposure through various compilations such as 17 Reasons, 18 Wit A Bullet, Organized Crime, Filthy Livin’ In The Mission, The Daily Grind ‘Fillmoe 2 Da Mission,’ and many others. There is a new generation of young and upcoming rappers who are emerging from this neighborhood such as G-One (R.I.P.), Los Da Rockstar, DJ Blaze, Rob Baysicc, Loco C, Young Mix and Yung Dunn to name a few.

Some other prominent musicians and musical personalities include:

Carnaval San Francisco Parade 2010 133

Carnaval San Francisco Parade 2010 133 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Festivals, Parades and Street Fairs

  • Carnival The major event of the year occurring each Memorial Day weekend is the Mission’s Carnaval celebration.[27]
  • 24th Street Fair In March of each year a street fair is held along the 24th Street corridor.
  • San Francisco Food Fair Annually, for several years recently, food trucks and vendor booths have sold food to tens of thousands of people along Folsom Street adjacent to La Cochina on the third weekend in September.[28]
  • Cesar Chavez Holiday Parade The second weekend of April is marked by a parade and celebration along 24th Street in honor of Cesar Chavez.[29]
  • Transgender and Dyke Marches. On the Fridays and Saturdays of the fourth weekend of June there are major celebrations of the Transgender and Dyke communities located at Dolores Park, followed by a march in the evenings along 18th Streets and Valencia Streets.[30][31]
  • Sunday Streets Twice each year, typically in May and October, Valencia, Harrision and 24th Streets are closed to automobile traffic and opened to pedestrians and bicyclists on Sunday as part of the Sunday Streets program.[32]
  • Day of the Dead Each year on November 2, a memorial procession and celebration of the dead occurs on Harrison and 24th Street with a gathering of memorials in Garfield Square.[33]
  • First Friday Monthly on the evening of the first Friday, a food and art crawl including a procession of low rider car clubs and samba dancers occurs along 24th Street from Potrero to Mission Streets.[34]
  • Open Studios On the first weekend of October, the ArtSpan organization arranges a district wide exhibit of Mission District artists studios.[35]
  • Hunky Jesus Contest Annually for 32 years on Easter Sunday the Sister’s of Perpetual Indulgence hold an Easter Sunday celebration including a Hunky Jesus Contest in Dolores Park.[36]
  • Rock Make Street Festival Annually for four years the Rock Make organization sponsors a music and arts festival in September on Treat and 18th Streets in the Mission.[37]
  • LitCrawl Annually on the third Saturday of October as part of the LitQuake, a literature festival, hundreds of book and poetry readings are held at bars and bookstores throughout the Mission.[38]
  • Party on Block 18 The Woman’s Building organization annually, typically in August, has held a street party on 18th Street between Valencia and Guerrero streets.[39][40]
  • Clarion Alley Block Party Eleven years annually, a block party on the Clarion mural alley, fourth weekend in October.[41][42]
  • Remembering 1906 Annually for 105 years there has been a gathering and ceremonial gold repainting ceremony of the fire hydrant located at Church and 20th streets in honor of the only working fire hydrant that allowed the cessation of the fire following the 1906 earth quake.[43]

Mission Bowling
Mission Bowling Club just opened in 2012

Transit

The neighborhood is served by the BART rail system with stations on Mission Street at 16th Street and 24th Street, by Munibus numbers 9, 12, 14, 14L, 22, 27, 33, 48, 49, 67, and along the western edge by the J Church Muni Metro line, which runs down Church Street and San Jose Avenue.

 

See also

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About Old S.F.

 

About Old S.F. (One our favorite sites here at ExploreSF)

Disclaimer: I am not affiliated with the San Francisco Public Library in any way.

This site provides an alternative way of browsing the SFPL‘s incredible San Francisco Historical
Photograph Collection
. Its goal is to help you discover the history
behind the places you see every day.

And, if you’re lucky, maybe you’ll even discover something about San Francisco’s rich past that you never knew before!

Where did these images come from?

The images all come from the San Francisco Public Library’s San Francisco Historical
Photograph Collection
. They were culled from many sources, including the
now-defunct San
Francisco News-Call Bulletin
.

The Library retains the copyright for many of these images. For details,
please read their Permissions page and FAQ.

The creators of this site did not collect or digitize any of these images
— credit for that massive undertaking belongs entirely to the
Library.

Who built this site?

The site was built by @danvdk and designed by @ravejk.Nob Hill 1896

What did this site do?

The creators of this site associated latitudes and longitudes to the images in
the San Francisco Historical Photograph Collection at the San Francisco Public Library, located in the Main Branch on the 6th floor. This process is known as geocoding. Doing this
allows the images to be placed at points on a map, which enables new ways of
exploring this collection.

 

How were they geocoded?

The geocodes are based on two sources:

  1. Photo Subjects. All photographs in the “City Hall (old)”
    series presumably belong in the same place. We manually geocoded several
    hundred subjects.
  2. Addresses and Cross-Streets. The photo descriptions often contain
    either an address, block number or set of cross-streets. These were
    converted to coordinates using the Google
    Geocoding API
    .

What’s the story of this project?

1945-1

Several years ago, I searched for my cross-streets
on the Library’s San Francisco Historical Photograph Collection and found the
photo on the right. The image was mislabeled — the intersection in the
foreground is actually Waller and Fillmore, not Waller and Webster. Which
meant that this photo from 1945 was taken from my roof!

I put together a now-and-then
shot, but it always bothered me that the mislabeling of the image was so
crucial to my finding it. This led to the idea of putting the images on a
map.

And now, years later, we have that map!

What fraction of the images have been geocoded?

The library’s collection contains about 40,000 images. Many of these
photographs have little geographic context (e.g. they’re portraits) and
cannot be located. In all, about 20,000 of the images could be placed on aHaight- Ashbury Hippies  during the 1967 Summer of Love San Francisco, Ca
map. We’ve geocoded about 65% of the possible images: 13,000.

How can you help?

If you’re technically minded, here’s a JSON file containing all the image
descriptions, as well as geocodes for the records on the map (including the
reason I thought they were at that location): records.js.zip (2MB download).
If you improve on my geocoding or do something else interesting with the data,
please share your results!

via About Old S.F..

 

 

 

 

To see this collection in person or to order reprints please come to The San Francisco Library, Main Branch, 100 Larkin Street, San Francisco, CA 94102 Telephone (415) 557-4567, email: info@sfpl.org
The San Francisco Historical Photograph Collection, located in the San Francisco History Center on the 6th floor, contains photographs and works on paper of San Francisco and California views from 1850 to the present. The Collection is open to the public on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1-5 and Saturdays 10-12 & 1-5

More about the collection

Explore the Library’s Geocoded Images On Old S.F.!

Two Construction Workers on the Golden Gate Bridge

 

Two construction workers on the Golden Gate Bridge

Date
September 18, 1935
Photo ID#
AAD-0884



About the Photo Collection

Photo Collection

The San Francisco Historical Photograph Collection contains photographs and works on papers of San Francisco and California scenes ranging from 1850 to the present. This collection includes views of San Francisco street scenes, buildings, and neighborhoods, as well as photographs of famous San Francisco personalities. The collection consists mostly of the photo morgue of the San Francisco News-Call Bulletin, a daily newspaper, ranging from 1920s to 1965. The collection also contains albums, slides, postcards, cabinet cards, stereoviews, and lantern slides of San Francisco and California subjects.

Copies of images may be ordered with the Reproduction of Images Form (PDF 31K). Many of the photographs are available for commercial use when a Permission to Publish Form (PDF 40K) has been submitted.

The collection may be viewed in two ways: through the online database on the San Francisco Public Library website, which contains 40,000 digitized images from the San Francisco Historical Photograph Collection, or in person during photo desk open hours.

Looking up in the atrium of the main branch of...

Looking up in the atrium of the main branch of the San Francisco Public Library, San Francisco, California, USA. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When viewing the collection in person, only a limited number of photographs may be examined at one time. Library users will be provided with gloves to wear while examining the photographs. The photographs are to be handled by the edges only and held securely on two sides. The following items are not to be used in contact with the photographs: pressure sensitive tapes, all types of glues, paper clips, elastic bands, staples, pins, pens or pencils. Photocopying of photographs is harmful to the image and is not allowed. Photographs may be reproduced through a photo lab of the Library’s choice, through the Library scanning service or through a scheduled photo shoot. See Order Images for details.

For further information about the San Francisco Historical Photograph Collection please call 415-557-4567 during open hours.

via About the Photo Collection :: San Francisco Public Library.

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April 7 2012 is MAPP! Mission Arts & Performance Project! This is not an artwalk!

Event:

Mission Arts & Performance Project

Date:

April 7, 2012 6:00 pm

Cost:

FREE

Category:

All, April, Events, MAPP, Performing Arts

 

Venue:

Red Poppy Arthouse

Phone:

1.415.826.2402

Address:

Google Map

2698 Folsom St, San Francisco, 94110, United States

Mission Arts and Performance Project

 

 

The Misson Arts & Performance Project (MAPP) is a FREE bimonthly festival that happens the first Saturday of every other month. Join us for this Saturday, April 7th!

Performance Program:

6pm – “The ItCH” – Investing in the Creative Hunch (Social-Cultural networking)

7:15pm – Tom Sway (Writer of Remarkable Songs)

7:42pm – Adrian Arias presents “The Lost Literary” (short film)

8:00pm – Poet Michael Warr & the Armageddon of Funk (poetry w/ live music)

8:40pm – Amy Seiwert’s Imagery (solo contemporary ballet)

9:00pm – Embodiment Project (urban dance theater company)

9:45pm – Sriba Kwadjovie (solo modern/contemporary dance)

10:00pm – Teobi Dreams (work-in-progress experimental performance)

10:30pm – Fared Shafinury – Skyping from Texas (Indy-Persian music)

11:15am-12am – The Anti-Hype Lounge (youtube projection DJ)

 

Download MAPP Program PDF Here

 



What is the MAPP Project? 

Launched in 2003, the Mission Arts & Performance Project (MAPP) is a homegrown bi-monthly, multidisciplinary, unruly intercultural happening that takes place in the Mission District of San Francisco. Started by Founding Artist of the Red Poppy Art House, Todd Brown, MAPP has now produced over 48 neighborhood-level arts festivals.

MAPP is not an “art walk” (thank god). Instead, it’s a collage of 10-20 odd spaces transformed into micro art centers, focused on intimate artistic and cultural exchange among people. Placing art and performance on the street level, MAPP utilizes such alternative spaces as private garages, gardens, living rooms, studios, street corners, and small businesses. At its heart, the MAPP shows how ordinary spaces can be made extra-ordinary through creative techniques.

The MAPP also beautifully demonstrates how individuals in a community in partnership with one another can create an integrated arts festival that does not require an expansive budget, outside funding, or commercial marketing strategies, but can happen through the inspired efforts of artists and community members working together with a unified and inclusive vision.

Part of the charm of the MAPP is that you never know quite what’s going to happen until you get there! This innovative platform allows serendipitous connections to emerge organically across visual artists, musicians, poets, dancers, choreographers, filmmakers, playwrights, and other artists, community organizers and local residents. However, adopting this platform also means sometimes not all of the most up-to-date information is available ahead of time. The point is to arrive and embrace the adventure. Plus, you’ll get a program (with an actual map) to navigate the event.

Be sure to check out the other MAPP spaces as well. Download a PDF of the Program here.

ICAL IMPORT

via Mission Arts & Performance Project | Red Poppy Arthouse.

a street in the Mission District, for which th...

a street in the Mission District, for which the festival was named (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

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The Beat Museum

The Beats Go On In San Francisco Museum

Jerry Cimino digs those beatnik poets: Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Allen Ginsberg, Neal Cassady and — oh, man — Jack Kerouac. When he read Kerouac’s “On the Road,” the spirit of adventure and honesty “really spoke to me,” Cimino said. “They were writers and musicians and artists who were following their passion.”

For years, Cimino, 51, worked in the computer industry and quietly built up a collection of Beat memorabilia. Finally, he decided to devote himself full time to his passion. “I wanted to do something that would really change people’s lives, and I think the spirit of the Beats can do that,” he said.

This month he opened the Beat Museum in San Francisco, which he calls “the cultural epicenter of the Beat Generation.” The museum features Cimino’s collection of photos, letters and first editions. The grand opening coincided with the arrival at the San Francisco Public Library of Kerouac’s manuscript for “On the Road” — a 120-foot-long scroll the author taped together so he wouldn’t have to interrupt his flow by shoving new sheets of paper into his typewriter. Hundreds of people have already passed through the Beat Museum, and locals are adding more to the collection.

The message, Cimino says, is simply this: “You can follow your passions later in life, too. Do what you want to do.”

 

The Beat Museum.

 

 

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SFMOMA | Exhibitions + Events | The Modern Ball 2012

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Wednesday, April 25, 2012

It’s the biggest art bash of the year! Join us for this signature celebration featuring dining, dancing, and art in support of SFMOMA’s renowned exhibitions and innovative education programs, serving more than 50,000 students, teachers, and families each year.

The Post-Modern Party

Mix it up in a whole new way as partygoers converge at a museumwide celebration featuring acclaimed electrofunk duo Chromeo, late-night bites from San Francisco’s hottest restaurants, drinks, and dancing into the night.

Individual tickets: $100 advance purchase and SFMOMA members; $125 after March 25, 2012; $150 at the door

BUY TICKETS

 

Time Details

9:00 p.m. Doors open

10:00 p.m. Chromeo DJ Set

Chromeo DJ set rocks the Post-Modern Party Party goers at the Post-Modern Party 2007

The Supper Club

See and be seen in an ultrachic lounge featuring a DJ, flowing drinks, and gourmet culinary stations.

Individual tickets: $500 – $1,000

BUY TICKETS

 

Time Details

6:30 p.m. Reserved Benefactor seating

8:00 p.m. Evening lounge (unreserved seating)

9:30 p.m. Access to all Post-Modern Party venues

The Supper Club 2007  The Supper Club 2007

The Gala Dinner

Experience the ultimate night out, including a sumptuous dinner, dazzling entertainment, a live auction featuring artist Doug Aitken’s 1968 (black), and irresistible surprises.

Individual tickets: SOLD OUT

Time Details

6:00 p.m. Cocktails – Evelyn and Walter Haas Jr. Atrium

7:00 p.m. Seated Dinner – The Gala Tent

9:30 p.m. Access to all Post-Modern Party venues

The Gala Dinner 2007 Doug Aitken’s 1968 (black) featured in premier live auction

For more information or to order tickets, please call 415.618.3263 or email modernball@sfmoma.org.

Please note: All Modern Ball attendees must be 21 and over.

Sorry, no refunds or exchanges. All sales are final.

 

via SFMOMA | Exhibitions + Events | The Modern Ball 2012.

Maharaja: The Splendor of India's Great Kings (Asian Art Museum)

Terence Clarke “Maharaja: The Splendor of India‘s Great Kings” in San Francisco

Occasionally, wretched excess is quite beautiful, and an example — many examples — can be found amply presented in “Maharaja: The Splendors of India’s Great Kings,” an exhibit currently up at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco, through April 8. Until now, I had not seen an entire carriage, the team for which would be four horses, made almost entirely of silver. But the Maharaja Bhavsinhji II of Bhavnagar had one such made for him in 1915 by the Fort Coach Factory of India, the finest carriage-maker of its time on the Indian sub-continent. The structure of the carriage is made of iron, but every metal surface — including even the bolts, the springs… everything — is clad entirely in silver. The carriage is also decorated with many delicate representations of flora and fauna, all done with impeccable care.

It is one of the most remarkable objects I have ever seen.

Used courtesy of the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts.
Not to put too close a political reading on this carriage, but it is also one of the finest representations of disregard for the welfare of one’s subjects that I can imagine. The fact that it is so intensely handsome a vehicle does little to alleviate one’s wonder at how Bhavsinhji’s subjects lived. I assume that they were mostly rural farmers or shopkeepers who were eking out a very slim living from their endeavors. And I assume that, since we’re talking about India, there were a great many of them.

That minor caveat having been considered, one can turn his attention to the amazing wealth — monetary and artistic — represented by this show.

Maharaja Bhupinder Singh of Patiala, 1911 National Portrait Gallery, London. Used courtesy of the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco

Prior to the English annexation of India in the nineteenth century, there were many dozens of kingdoms in the sub-continent, each of them governed by a maharaja (or, depending upon the regional language being spoken, by a raja, rana, rao, maharana, maharawal, maharao, nawab, nizam, etc.) Various political or marital arrangements, intrigues and wars had resulted over the millennia in these kingdoms, and some of them were among the most splendid in the world.

There were strict expectations for the maharajas. Writers Anna Jackson and Amin Jaffer describe, in this exhibit’s fine and very beautifully illustrated catalogue, what these duties were:

India’s rulers were expected to exercise appropriate behavior, their royal duties or rajadharma encompassing the protection of their subjects, the adjudication of disputes and the ministering of justice and punishment… Kings were expected to be wise and benevolent, and to be fierce warriors and skilled hunters. India’s rulers also exercised their rajadharma through their patronage of religious practitioners and institutions, poets and musicians, architects, artists and craftspeople.
They were also expected to be great ceremonial leaders who exhibit true majesty and presence. Thus the extraordinary luxury and often great beauty of everything in this exhibit.

Almost all the graphic and plastic arts are represented here. For me, the real interest lies in the many paintings, mostly by Indian artists and some by Europeans. The skill at showing scenes almost maniacally crowded with people and animals (elephants, usually) with delicate clarity, fine attention to composition and beautiful color is exemplified by a small painting titled “Procession of Maharao Ram Singh II of Kota,” from about 1850.

 

Procession of Maharao Ram Singh II of Kota, c. 1850. Victoria and Albert Museum, London. Used courtesy of the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco.
In her essay in the catalogue about such a procession, Joanne Punzo Waghorne points out that “however extravagant or even baroque, these displays were never frivolous. They were the rituals that kept the royal body politic compelling for its subjects.” Just so is the grandeur compelling to the viewer of this painting, the complexity of design and colors of which demand your attention. The figure of the beautiful woman dancing for the maharao’s pleasure while borne up on the tusks of the royal elephant is a spectacle the likes of which can barely be imagined.

Necklace commissioned by Maharaja Bhupinder Singh of Patiala, 1928. Cartier, Paris. Used courtesy of the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco.

As you can see from the photo above of Maharaja Bhupinder Singh, jewels in great quantity were a mark of the leader’s majesty and otherworldly grandiloquence. In 1928, this same man commissioned a necklace for his wife from Cartier of Paris that was made with platinum, diamonds, yellow zirconia, white zirconias, topazes, rubies, smoky quartz and citrine. Were she to be wearing some of the royal clothing exhibited in this show, this necklace would surely adorn one of the most spectacularly dressed women in the world.

After the arrival of the British, the maharajas lost most of their real political power. But they were retained by the British for important ceremonial reasons, primarily to support the empire’s claim on India. Some of the kings and their wives became darlings of the European social set, and their palaces were often furnished in the most contemporary European design. They would have been educated in Europe and would have traveled frequently to European capitals.

One such couple were the Maharaja Yeshwani Rao Holkar II and Maharani Sanyogita Devi of Indore. They became friends with the photographer Man Ray, who often photographed them.

Maharaja Yeshwani Rao Holkar II and Maharani Sanyogita Devi of Indore, c. 1930. Man Ray, Al-Thani Collection. Used courtesy of the Asian Art Museum, San Francisco.
This exhibit was originally mounted by The Victoria and Albert Museum in London. One of its great pluses lies in the fact that it introduces the viewer to a remarkable world of which he may not have known prior to going to the show itself. Many of the objects displayed are close to unbelievable. I would not have missed seeing them for anything.

English:

Asian Art Museum, San Francisco

Asian Art Museum . India , Indian Kings

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From the permanent collection of the Asian Art...

From The Permanent Collection, Asian Art Museum