Category Archives: Photographs

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This Sunday, come Explore San Francisco and create some wonderful Mother’s Day memories to last a long time.

Take Mom out for a food tour and a cruise on the Bay for only $64!
Choose any of these food tours:

  • North Beach at Night
  • Mission Vegetarian
  • Little Saigon
  • Mission District South (24th Street)
  • The Real Chinatown

Paired with a Bay Cruise on San Francisco Bay!


To make reservations or for more information, please call:415.504.3636 x 102 or email: reservations@exploresf.bizLimited number of spots available
Golden Gate Bay CruiseOperated by:

Red and White Fleet

Give her the fun day she deserves
While making memories to last a lifetime

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Prague flower shop

Prague flower shop (Photo credit: jafsegal)

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Kick Off Spring with These Three Art Shows | 7×7

Kick Off Spring with These Three Art Shows

Katharina Wulff, Die Verbindung (The Connection), 2008; oil on canvas;

48 1/16 x 68 7/8 in. (122 x 175 cm); Olbricht Collection; © Katharina

Wulff

The city’s museums now have their major exhibitions out and swinging (you’ve seen Foto Mexico and Gaultier; the ads plastered over town are maybe coaxing a return visit) and the gallery circuit is on the cusp of exploding into a big spring season. Our suggestion: take this weekend to explore some of the Bay’s slightly smaller, considerably less hyped, but no doubt equally fascinating museum shows. Here are three picks.

New Work: Katharina Wulff at SFMOMA

Katharina Wulff is unmistakably contemporary in how freely she channels the modern. Befitting for an institution that hangs the likes of Matisse and Dalí, Wulff’s whimsical and captivating paintings are at turns Fauvist, Surrealist and Dada. The whole of art history is the Moroccan-based artist’s playground.

Consisting of twenty works, this showing marks the artist’s first ever solo exhibition in the U.S., and, more importantly, her west coast debut. What can you expect? Much in the way of fantastical landscapes, confused perspective, bizarre-looking animals and still more bizarre-looking people. They brim with color and intrigue, never staying too long in any one place.

Katharina Wulff runs through September 4, 2012, at SFMOMA, 151 3rd Street

Modern Cartoonist: The Art of Daniel Clowes at Oakland Museum of California

Don’t call them comic books. The twenty first century graphic novel has elevated the panel-illustrated narrative to unprecedented heights. It’s been a thrilling and lucrative progression, and Oakland’s own Daniel Clowes has been at the forefront from the beginning. Some accounts would place this remarkably gifted illustrator, who has over fifty publications under his belt as well as an academy award nomination for screenplay, as the genre’s reigning patriarch.

The OMCA’s sprawling, installation-based show marks the first major survey of Clowe’s work to date. Complete with original drawings, artifacts and an extensive full-color monograph, this form of recognition is long overdue.

Modern Cartoonist runs through August 24, 2012, at Oakland Museum of California, 1000 Oak Street

Femmescapes at Mills College Art Museum

Femmescapes at Mills College Art Museum

A group of Mills College students were given a pretty amazing opportunity: to freely mine Lenore Pereira and Rich Niles’ marvelous collection of contemporary work by women artists. With names like Louise Bourgeois, Ann Hamilton and Francesca Woodman on the roster, this is a trove that many professional curators would probably kill for a chance to have at.

The resulting exhibition, Femmescapes, explores the various conceptual and metaphorical intertwinings of femininity and environment – nature as a woman, woman as land (lush, fertile, barren, etc.), body as landscape. Featuring about 40 works of painting, video, photography and sculpture, this is a unique glimpse not to be missed.

Femmescapes is on view Saturdays and Sundays only, through May 6, at 70 South Park

via Kick Off Spring with These Three Art Shows | 7×7.

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Marina Partiers Leave Behind Massive Fort Mason Mess: SFist

 

Partiers Leave Behind Massive Fort Mason Mess

 

: Andrew Dalton/SFist

Happy Earth Day, everybody! Just when we thought our faith in the drunkards had been restored, we spotted this disaster area left behind after throngs of Marina District revelers took their overconsumption outdoors yesterday afternoon. After a brief stop at the Marina Dateway, where the neighborhood grocery store was experiencing a run on domestic beer and ladies were overheard discussing the caloric content of various vodkas, we found this scene on the grass at Fort Mason around 7 p.m. Saturday evening.

What looked something like this during the afternoon, by sunset looked like a good place to catch Hepatitis. That’s also when the seagulls started swooping in, probably looking for beer can rings to choke themselves to death with. (Because of how disappointed in humanity they were.)

Not to get all hippie-preachy or anything, but this is kind of an offensive amount of trash, right? Do normal and reasonable human beings not look at that mess and say, “…maybe we ought to like, I don’t know? Take some of this trash with us? To a trash can?” or “Maybe we should bring that coffee table back home?” We’ve seen our share of litter-y days in Dolores Park and some embarrassing trash pileups in Golden Gate Park, but leaving actual pieces of living room furniture is a whole new level of prickish park use.

“Those trash picker guys are going to be stoked about this!” was one justification we heard for the mess. We tried to get someone from the neighborhood recycling center on the phone to settle that bet, but they are unfortunately not open on Sundays, so we’ll have to follow up on that later.

Anyhow, much of the mess was still around this morning, even after the recyclers had picked it over. Which is disheartening in that “this is why we can’t have nice things” sort of way. Enjoying scenic vistas around every corner is one of the nicest parts about living in San Francisco. And Fort Mason has one hell of a Bridge view, so why would you just throw a piece of garbage in front of that, you know?

Anyhow, in the interest of fairness, if anyone took any similar photos in Dolores Park or any other public park this weekend, please do share. We’d love to find out which park has San Francisco’s messiest crowd.

Note: Misson Local has a look at the state of Dolores Park this morning. The Mission looks like it had its own share of litterbugs this weekend, but considering the huge crowds we saw at Dolores Park yesterday afternoon, we’re still calling this one for the Marina.

 

 

 

 

 

 

FAUX (FOX) NEWS UPDATE (April 24): Fox Nation picked up the trashy item, using it to fabricate an entire story to blame green activists.

via Marina Partiers Leave Behind Massive Fort Mason Mess: SFist.

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Video: A Day in the Life of San Francisco

[tube]http://www.youtube.com/v/KCpeKanDXHU[/tube]

Photos from FB Fan Page

Wall Photos from Facebook Fan Page:

 

 

http://exploresanfrancisco.biz/blog/2012/04/06/about-old-s-f/#.T46F1u3gixw

"SF Scenic Running"

SF Scenic Running

 

of the newest trends for the health conscious traveler is seeing thesights while ona run.  Join our enthusiastic and experienced guides for a

 

run on the best running trails that San Francisco has to offer. Our city runs meld the urban landscape with the natural beauty of he parks and coastal trails.  The phenomenal ocean and bay views and sweeping vistas overlooking the Golden Gate Bridge are enhanced by the dramatic hilly terrain.

via “AF Scenic Running”.

Art In Nature

Run the Golden Gate Park to SF Presidio
ART IN NATURE
1 Artist
3 Installations
6 Miles

Golden Gate Promenade

Run along the San Francisco Promenade and Crissy Field to the Golden Gate Bridge.
6.2 miles / 10km

Land’s End & The Legion Of Honor

Run along the Lands End coastal trail to the overlook at the Palace of the Legion of Honor.
6 Miles / 9.5km
5 Over 5: The Hills of San Francisco

Night shot of Golden Gate Bridge and San Francisco

Night shot of Golden Gate Bridge and San Francisco (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Run to the top of 5 hills each over 500 ft. high, enjoying panoramic views along the way.
7 miles / 11kmGolden Gate Park

Explore the natural beauty of this 1,000 acre urban park.
Various distances available.

Personalized Running Tours: You Name It- We Map It!

Personalized running tours are available by request. Let us custom design an ideal run for you and your group.  You can determine the distance, neighborhoods, terrain, scenery or levels of difficulty to meet your interests and goals.

Below are some examples of the trail and urban runs our clients have enjoyed:

  • *Golden Gate Park and the SF Presidio trails
  • *Union Square ~ Fisherman’s Wharf ~ North Beach ~ Chinatown
  • *Bay To Breakers

Please contact us for details and prices.

Custom Training Runs

We offer more than just running tours. Are you in San Francisco for business or pleasure yet still need to get in a training run for an upcoming event?
Do you live in San Francisco and want to explore new routes to enhance your running experience?
Our seasoned running staff can step in as your guide, coach, training partner or personal trainer to work with you during your stay in an unfamiliar city, or to explore the wonderful city you call home. We’ll eliminate the guesswork and show you the best locations to run.
Our runs are tailored to suit your specific interests, fitness level and training needs.
Please contact us for details and prices.

 

Map & Directions
Reserve your spot now

More Information: 415.680.8982
E-mail: ScenicRunning@ExploreSF.biz

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About Old S.F.

 

About Old S.F. (One our favorite sites here at ExploreSF)

Disclaimer: I am not affiliated with the San Francisco Public Library in any way.

This site provides an alternative way of browsing the SFPL‘s incredible San Francisco Historical
Photograph Collection
. Its goal is to help you discover the history
behind the places you see every day.

And, if you’re lucky, maybe you’ll even discover something about San Francisco’s rich past that you never knew before!

Where did these images come from?

The images all come from the San Francisco Public Library’s San Francisco Historical
Photograph Collection
. They were culled from many sources, including the
now-defunct San
Francisco News-Call Bulletin
.

The Library retains the copyright for many of these images. For details,
please read their Permissions page and FAQ.

The creators of this site did not collect or digitize any of these images
— credit for that massive undertaking belongs entirely to the
Library.

Who built this site?

The site was built by @danvdk and designed by @ravejk.Nob Hill 1896

What did this site do?

The creators of this site associated latitudes and longitudes to the images in
the San Francisco Historical Photograph Collection at the San Francisco Public Library, located in the Main Branch on the 6th floor. This process is known as geocoding. Doing this
allows the images to be placed at points on a map, which enables new ways of
exploring this collection.

 

How were they geocoded?

The geocodes are based on two sources:

  1. Photo Subjects. All photographs in the “City Hall (old)”
    series presumably belong in the same place. We manually geocoded several
    hundred subjects.
  2. Addresses and Cross-Streets. The photo descriptions often contain
    either an address, block number or set of cross-streets. These were
    converted to coordinates using the Google
    Geocoding API
    .

What’s the story of this project?

1945-1

Several years ago, I searched for my cross-streets
on the Library’s San Francisco Historical Photograph Collection and found the
photo on the right. The image was mislabeled — the intersection in the
foreground is actually Waller and Fillmore, not Waller and Webster. Which
meant that this photo from 1945 was taken from my roof!

I put together a now-and-then
shot, but it always bothered me that the mislabeling of the image was so
crucial to my finding it. This led to the idea of putting the images on a
map.

And now, years later, we have that map!

What fraction of the images have been geocoded?

The library’s collection contains about 40,000 images. Many of these
photographs have little geographic context (e.g. they’re portraits) and
cannot be located. In all, about 20,000 of the images could be placed on aHaight- Ashbury Hippies  during the 1967 Summer of Love San Francisco, Ca
map. We’ve geocoded about 65% of the possible images: 13,000.

How can you help?

If you’re technically minded, here’s a JSON file containing all the image
descriptions, as well as geocodes for the records on the map (including the
reason I thought they were at that location): records.js.zip (2MB download).
If you improve on my geocoding or do something else interesting with the data,
please share your results!

via About Old S.F..

 

 

 

 

To see this collection in person or to order reprints please come to The San Francisco Library, Main Branch, 100 Larkin Street, San Francisco, CA 94102 Telephone (415) 557-4567, email: info@sfpl.org
The San Francisco Historical Photograph Collection, located in the San Francisco History Center on the 6th floor, contains photographs and works on paper of San Francisco and California views from 1850 to the present. The Collection is open to the public on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1-5 and Saturdays 10-12 & 1-5

More about the collection

Explore the Library’s Geocoded Images On Old S.F.!

Two Construction Workers on the Golden Gate Bridge

 

Two construction workers on the Golden Gate Bridge

Date
September 18, 1935
Photo ID#
AAD-0884



About the Photo Collection

Photo Collection

The San Francisco Historical Photograph Collection contains photographs and works on papers of San Francisco and California scenes ranging from 1850 to the present. This collection includes views of San Francisco street scenes, buildings, and neighborhoods, as well as photographs of famous San Francisco personalities. The collection consists mostly of the photo morgue of the San Francisco News-Call Bulletin, a daily newspaper, ranging from 1920s to 1965. The collection also contains albums, slides, postcards, cabinet cards, stereoviews, and lantern slides of San Francisco and California subjects.

Copies of images may be ordered with the Reproduction of Images Form (PDF 31K). Many of the photographs are available for commercial use when a Permission to Publish Form (PDF 40K) has been submitted.

The collection may be viewed in two ways: through the online database on the San Francisco Public Library website, which contains 40,000 digitized images from the San Francisco Historical Photograph Collection, or in person during photo desk open hours.

Looking up in the atrium of the main branch of...

Looking up in the atrium of the main branch of the San Francisco Public Library, San Francisco, California, USA. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When viewing the collection in person, only a limited number of photographs may be examined at one time. Library users will be provided with gloves to wear while examining the photographs. The photographs are to be handled by the edges only and held securely on two sides. The following items are not to be used in contact with the photographs: pressure sensitive tapes, all types of glues, paper clips, elastic bands, staples, pins, pens or pencils. Photocopying of photographs is harmful to the image and is not allowed. Photographs may be reproduced through a photo lab of the Library’s choice, through the Library scanning service or through a scheduled photo shoot. See Order Images for details.

For further information about the San Francisco Historical Photograph Collection please call 415-557-4567 during open hours.

via About the Photo Collection :: San Francisco Public Library.

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Union Square 1800s Photo Gallery