Category Archives: News

Historic March and Festival, Saturday, October 4th, 2014

Come On Home (album)

Come On Home (album) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


March/Rally October 4 2014

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No Monster in the Mission  :: ¡Basta Ya!
Historic March, Rally, and Festival
SATURDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1-6pm
Get more information.

 

 

 

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WE ARE THE PLAZA 16 COALITION

We are neighborhood residents, businesses, and community organizations from the 16th and Mission neighborhood and Mission District.

We believe in equitable development that creates healthy, vibrant, communities of opportunity. We believe this requires thoughtful, intentional, and community-based strategies to ensure that low-income communities and communities of color participate in and benefit from the decisions that shape our neighborhoods and our city’s transit-oriented development.

View a PDF of the presentation from our May 15th Community Forum at the Victoria Theater.

Learn more about the Plaza 16 Coalition and how you can join our efforts.

Read our vision statement for development in our neighborhood and our demands for development at 1979 Mission Street at the 16th and Mission BART plaza.

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This Sunday, come Explore San Francisco and create some wonderful Mother’s Day memories to last a long time.

Take Mom out for a food tour and a cruise on the Bay for only $64!
Choose any of these food tours:

  • North Beach at Night
  • Mission Vegetarian
  • Little Saigon
  • Mission District South (24th Street)
  • The Real Chinatown

Paired with a Bay Cruise on San Francisco Bay!


To make reservations or for more information, please call:415.504.3636 x 102 or email: reservations@exploresf.bizLimited number of spots available
Golden Gate Bay CruiseOperated by:

Red and White Fleet

Give her the fun day she deserves
While making memories to last a lifetime

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Prague flower shop

Prague flower shop (Photo credit: jafsegal)

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Pacific Telephone Building From Condos To Yelp



Pac Bell Building

Scraps Plans For Condos

Yelp Is Moving to 140  Montgomery Street

 

Back in 2007, developers Wilson Meany Sullivan (of Ferry Building and One Powell fame) acquired the Timothy Pfleuger art deco skycraper at 140 New Montgomery Street. Known as the Pacific Telephone & Telegraph Building, the tower was one of the tallest skyscrapers on the West Coast at the time it was constructed in 1925. The developers had grand plans to renovate the building into luxury condos, and even got through the permitting and entitlements labyrinth in 2008. Unfortunately for them, the plans were hatched right before the recession, and the loss of funding cause the project to stall out for the past four years.

Fast forward to today and the office market has started to boom again, so the developers have redirected the project. With a $50 million-plus modernization project about to begin, the new rehabilitation will include a major seismic retrofit and upgrading the skyscraper’s 280,000 square feet of available office space to house potential tech start-ups, venture-capital firms and others. According to the project website, the space will included high-end amenities like a private

outdoor tenant garden, showers, bike parking and repair rooms, and first-class ground-floor dining. Are you listening, future fancy tenants?

Designed by local superstar architect Timothy Pflueger (art deco mastermind behind the Transbay TerminalNew Mission TheaterCCSF, and the Paramount Theater in Oakland), it has soaring terra-cotta piers, art deco details and 13-foot-tall eagle statues at the top – not to mention a pretty fierce marble lobby. There’s also a 26th floor auditorium (sure, why not?), complete with bas reliefs with a snake charmer, elephants and other animals. According to the plans, WMS seeks to maintain the architectural integrity of the building – vintage light fixtures in the lobby will be restored, original bronze medallions on the elevator doors replicated, and the old mail chute retained.

It won’t be all historic sentimentality though, as the plan also include measures to modernize and add safety features to the building. They will replace 1,300 of the building’s 1,700 steel-frame windows, install seismic bracing and modernize the elevators. The developer also plans to create two new retail or restaurant spaces off the restored main lobby. According to the Wall Street Journal, the building should beready for occupancy in the summer of 2013.


UPDATE**** YELP Moving in

Yelp has given San Francisco a five-star rating, committing itself to stay in its hometown through at least 2021.

The popular online review site, one of the first dot-coms to set up shop in the city after the Internet bubble burst, will announce Thursday that it has signed a roughly 100,000-square-foot lease at the Pacific Telephone Building, an Art Deco classic of the city’s skyline.

Pac Bell Building

Pac Bell Building (Photo credit: jgatts)

“We’ve grown up here in the city, and it’s fair to say that Yelp wouldn’t have been as successful had we not started in a city like San Francisco,” said Jeremy Stoppelman, chief executive of Yelp, in describing why the company decided to keep its headquarters here. “It’s a very dynamic cultural scene, lots of restaurants and nightlife, and all those things feed nicely into what Yelp is about.”

Contributing factors included the deepening design and engineering talent pool in the city, the convenient commute to that slice of South of Market and the unique character of 140 New Montgomery St., he said.

Designed by prominent architect Timothy Pflueger in the 1920s, the Pacific Telephone Building is considered one of the finest Art Deco skyscrapers in the city, routinely praised in local architecture guides.

Yelp will relocate from its current space at 706 Mission St. in the fall of 2013. The new space will accommodate around 800 employees, room to grow from the roughly 500 San Francisco workers Yelp has today.

 

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Good Samaritan assaulted after breaking up a assault at Salem Liquor Store as shopkeepers watched

Boycott Salem Liquors

By: Rob Nagle | 06/18/12 8:01 PM

SF Examiner Staff Writer

COURTESY PHOTOS
Leo Volobrynskyy before the altercation, left. He lost a tooth to a punch after he interrupted an assault Friday.

A gay man who says he witnessed another man being beaten and taunted with anti-gay slurs in a Tenderloin liquor store became a victim himself after he called police.

Leo Volobrynskyy, 30, a San Francisco resident originally from Odessa, Ukraine, is now missing a tooth and has at least 14 stitches in his mouth after an incident at a liquor store near Geary and Larkin streets, he told The San Francisco Examiner on Sunday. His cellphone was also stolen during the incident.

Volobrynskyy said he had left a San Francisco International LGBT Film Festival opening-night party and was on his way to visit a friend about 1:30 a.m. Friday when he stopped by the store to pick up a bottle of wine. While browsing, he heard a fight in the next aisle.

Volobrynskyy said a man was sitting atop a another man, hitting him, yelling “faggot” and saying, “This is my store, just don’t come here.” The victim was screaming, “Please don’t kill me” and, “Just let me go,” according to Volobrynskyy. He said that while the attack was occurring about three or four men, including the cashier, laughed and cheered.

“When I realized what was happening, I walked outside the store and called 911,” Volobrynskyy said. Not long after, he saw the victim run from the store. The next thing he knew, the attacker was in his face.

“Why did you f—ing call the cops?” the man asked Volobrynskyy. The thug punched him in the face, snatched his cellphone and fled, Volobrynskyy said.

“I lost consciousness for a second,” he said. “I had a mouthful of blood.”

When he got up, he saw the same group of gawkers from inside the store out front laughing at him, he said.
Volobrynskyy made it to his friend’s house, where they called police. When cops arrived, the men at the store denied having seen anything, Volobrynskyy said. He was taken to the hospital for his injuries. The following day a dentist had to remove his tooth.

A police report corroborates Volobrynskyy’s story, except there is nothing in it about inflammatory or derogatory comments, police Officer Albie Esparza said. The police are not treating the incident as a hate crime at this time.

“This is actually why we march,” Volobrynskyy said in regard to the attack happening during Gay Pride Month.

“Because we’re still not safe. This is supposed to be the safest city for gays to live in, and clearly it’s not safe enough.”

The assailant in the case was described as a white man about 25 years old, 6-foot-2 and about 175 to 190 pounds.

He was wearing blue jeans that hung low around his waist, a white T-shirt, either a gray or blue hoodie and a dark-colored baseball cap. No arrest had been made as of Monday.

Although the intervention didn’t end well for him Friday, it wasn’t the first time Volobrynskyy was a good Samaritan.

In November 2011, Volobrynskyy and a friend, along with two others, helped pull an unconscious man out of a burning car in the South of Market neighborhood.

The four were given Good Samaritan Awards by The City for their actions and were also honored by the Police and Fire departments, Volobrynskyy said.

He hopes Friday’s incident doesn’t stop people from doing the right thing.

“I really hope it doesn’t discourage people from stepping in and helping when help is needed,” Volobrynskyy said. “I do believe when they saw me call police that helped the other guy get away.”

Courtesy Photos

rnagle@sfexaminer.com

 

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Showing 10 comments

  • Leo Volobrynskyy

    Salem liquor store. Geary between larking and polk

  • Johnd

    What liquor store was it? Woerner’s Liquors? Please tell us. I hope the victim(s) sue the cashier and store both. That behavior is ridiculous.

  • Sfnutbiy

    let us know which liquor store.
    No one will be spending money there.
    let em saw nothings.
    Enail for boycott info.

    sfnutboy@gmail.com

  • americanmark

    Mr. Volobrynskyy is a good man for calling the cops; hope his boss gives him a few days off – paid.

  • George Irving

    It looks like the guy will need money to fix the tooth.  Maybe the Examiner could reprint  the article and do a collection.

  • Atomic

    Wasn’t there some big pronouncement about the lowering of violent crime in San Francisco?

  • “Arf!” Lemming, Shipyard . New Deal Democrat

     That store’s just about 50 ft from The Gang Way Bar’s entrance , too.

  • sound of silence

    Violence as usual in District 6…Supervisor Jane “Bed Bugs” Kim…what exactly has she done to even go public and strongly support police in her district to fight violent crime.   Ahh yes the sound of progressive silence….after all this is just “quality of life” type crime right?  That is what the progressives will have you believe.

  • “Arf!” Lemming, Shipyard . New Deal Democrat

    She’ll probably suggest or attempt to mandate
    head of the line preferences for trades
    apprenticeships for the thugees…then call Orkin.

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We are all doomed by 2072 see the San Francisco Archipelago « Burrito Justice

San Francisco Archipelago

MARCH 20, 2012

tags: climate change, future history, islands, map, sea level

March 20th, 2072 (AP), Northern California Association of City States:

With the surprising acceleration of sea level rise due to the melting of both the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets over the past decade, the San Francisco canal system was officially abandoned this week. Additional ferry service has been announced between the new major islands of the San Franciscan Archipelago while the boring machines make progress under the Van Ness Passage and Richmond Pass for new transit tunnels.

sf-sea-rise-crop.png

Unlike most coastal areas of the former United States, the population of the archipelago has dramatically increased despite the 200 foot rise in sea level over the past 60 years. Pundits debate whether this is due to the increasingly tropical temperatures or the creative and cultural explosion due to density. Regardless, the 4 million people now living on the SFA are demanding expansion of the San Andreas airport — studies are underway to build three more runways on the former 280 right of way.

However, the new class of supersonic Clippers will be in service by 2074 and Pan Am claims they can provide direct service to both Haight Inlet and Excelsior Lagoon, much to the relief of the Juniper Serra Conglomeration. (The JSC clearly prefers repurposing the old road to construct a rail gun space launch system with the help of Stanford Alto.)

The cruise ship berths along Divisidero Harbor continue to be upgraded, while negotiations are underway with Port Orinda and Caldecott Harbor to handle the cargo from the outdated facilities at Geary Sound. With the addition of the 6th high speed rail tube to the mainland, the original tunnels (completed in 2025) will be dedicated to cargo.

Development of high rises along the Sunset Coast and Cape Dolores has not been without controversy. The SHSFPA (Submerged Historic San Francisco Preservation Association) has once again protested and filed an environment historic review. “Old San Francisco is still alive in our hearts and minds, even if only the tops of the buildings can be seen! Look at the Flickr archive! Viva La Décimonovena! Viva El Vigésimocuarto!” While the SHSFPA frustrate many, all agree that their work floating Victorians and Italinate era homes and converting them houseboats has been a grand success, and has fueled a tourist boom along the Noe, Bernal and Dolores docks. The historical reenactments of life in the Mission District of the early 21st century have proven particularly popular.

While the submerged ruins of the Sunset and the Mission have always been popular diving attractions, many have already forgotten the locations of long-flooded streets and avenues. The SHSFPA recently published this overlay map showing early 21st century streets (double-blink to zoom, triple-blink for 3D):

sf-sea-rise-overlay-72.png

While other islands have embraced both bridges and tunnels — the 150 year old bridges across Glen Narrows are scheduled for destruction once the new suspension bridge to Bernal Isle is complete — Potrero Island continues to be a holdout. Residents have yet again rejected the bond measure for a floating pontoon bridge crossing Beronio Reef and Market Shoals. Ask any Potreran and you will get the same response: “We were the first island, and we will be the last island. The cable gondola to Sutro Tower and Bernal is too much as it is.” Unfortunately, with sea levels increasing, they will very likely be flooded out by the turn of the century as this animation shows (GIF2023 support required, gesture for higher resolution holograph):

sf-sea-level-animation-big.gif

Is the future of the San Franciscan Archipelago doomed? Some environmental experts from the NOAA in the Washington DC SeaDome think so. “With sea levels continuing to rise at over three feet per year, the continued investment in the Archipelago is foolish. The failure of the Los Angeles seawall in 2049 is proof of this. And just look at the projection at 300 feet. Potrero’s all but gone and Bernal Isle is cut in half.”

sf-archipelago-3001.png

As usual, San Franciscans are undeterred. “We won’t let those waterlogged Morlocks who pretend the United States still exists try to tell us what works. Even if we have to build a dozen more mile high Sutro Towers, we will stay here. We’ll anchor a floating city to the serpentine and chert if we have to.”

“But we do miss the fog.”

SF topological map via the most excellent Urban Life Signs. It turns out they were also working on a 25 foot sea level rise map, something we could very well see in our lifetimes.

Potential Sea Level Rise from melting ice caps:

  • Greenland: 6.6 meters (21 feet)
  • West Antarctic: 8.1 meters (26 feet)
  • East Antarctic: 65 meters (213 feet)

120,000 years ago, SF Bay was 20 feet higher than today.

125,000 years ago, San Francisco was actually an island thanks to the Colma Strait. More here.

via San Francisco Archipelago « Burrito Justice.

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The battle of 8 Washington | SF Bay Guardian

The battle of 8 Washington

Condos for millionaires approved with progressives split

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The condos at 8 Washington (center) would be the tallest buildings and the priciest housing along the waterfront

tredmond@sfbg.com

More than 100 people showed up May 15 to testify on a condominium development that involves only 134 units, but has become a symbol of the failure of San Francisco’s housing policy.

I didn’t count every single speaker, but it’s fair to say sentiment was about 2-1 against the 8 Washington project. Seniors, tenant advocates, and neighbors spoke of the excessive size and bulk of the complex, the precedent of upzoning the waterfront for the first time in half a century, the loss of the Golden Gateway Swim and Tennis Club — and, more important, the principle of using public land to build the most expensive condos in San Francisco history.

Ted Gullicksen, director of the San Francisco Tenants Union, calls it housing for the 1 percent, but it’s worse than that — it’s actually housing for the top half of the top half of the 1 percent, for the ultra-rich.

It is, even supervisors who voted in favor agreed, housing the city doesn’t need, catering to a population that doesn’t lack housing opportunities — and a project that puts the city even further out of compliance with its own affordable-housing goals.

And in the end, after more than seven hours of testimony, the board voted 8-3 in favor of the developer.

It was a defeat for progressive housing advocates and for Board President David Chiu — and it showed a schism on the board’s left flank that would have been unthinkable a few years ago. And it could also have significant implications for the fall supervisorial elections.

Sup. Jane Kim, usually an ally of Chiu, voted in favor of the project. Sup. Eric Mar, who almost always votes with the board’s left flank, supported it, too, as did Sup. Christina Olague, who is running for re-election in one of the city’s most progressive districts.

At the end of the night, only Sups. David Campos and John Avalos joined Chiu in attempting to derail 8 Washington.

The battle of 8 Washington isn’t over — the vote last week was to approve the environmental impact report and the conditional use permit, but the actual development agreement and rezoning of the site still requires board approval next month.

Both Mar and Olague said they were going to work with the developer to try to get the height and bulk of the 134-unit building reduced.

But a vote against the EIR or the CU would have killed the project, and the thumbs-up is a signal that opponents will have an upward struggle to change the minds of Olague, Kim, and Mar.

 

DEFINING VOTES

The 8 Washington project is one of a handful of defining votes that will happen over the next few months. The mayor’s proposal for a business tax reform that raises no new revenue, the budget, and the massive California Pacific Medical Center hospital project will force board members to take sides on controversial issues with heavy lobbying on both sides.

In fact, by some accounts, 8 Washington was a beneficiary of the much larger, more complicated — and frankly, more significant — CPMC development.

The building trades unions pushed furiously for 8 Washington, which isn’t surprising — the building trades tend to support almost anything that means jobs for their members and have often been in conflict with progressives over development. But the Hotel and Restaurant Employees Union joined the building trades and lined up the San Francisco Labor Council behind the deal.

And for progressive supervisors who are up for re-election and need union support — Olague and Mar, for example — defying the Labor Council on this one was tough. “Labor came out strong for this, and I respect that,” Olague told me. “That was a huge factor for me.”

She also said she’s not thrilled with the deal — “nobody’s jumping up and down. This was a hard one” — but she thinks she can get the developer to pay more fees, particularly for parking.

The battle of 8 Washington – Page 2

Condos for millionaires approved with progressives split

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The condos at 8 Washington (center) would be the tallest buildings and the priciest housing along the waterfront

Kim isn’t facing re-election for another two years, and she told me her vote was all about the $11 million in affordable housing money that the developer will provide to the city. “I looked at the alternatives and I didn’t see anything that would provide any housing money at all,” she said. The money is enough to build perhaps 25 units of low- and moderate-income housing, and that’s a larger percentage than any other developer has offered, she said.

Which is true — although the available figures suggest that Simon Snellgrove, the lead project sponsor, could pay a lot more and still make a whopping profit. And the Council of Community Housing Organizations, which represents the city’s nonprofit affordable housing developers, didn’t support the deal and expressed serious reservations about it.

Several sources close to the lobbying effort told me that the message for the swing-vote supervisors was that labor wanted them to approve at least one of the two construction-job-creating developments. Opposing both CPMC and 8 Washington would have infuriated the unions, but by signing off on this one, the vulnerable supervisors might get a pass on turning down CMPC.

That’s an odd deal for labor, since CPMC is 10 times the size of 8 Washington and will involve far more jobs. But the nurses and operating engineers have been fighting with the health-care giant and there’s little chance that labor will close ranks behind the current hospital deal.

Labor excepted, the hearing was a classic of grassroots against astroturf. Some of the people who showed up and sat in the front row with pro-8 Washington stickers on later told us they had been paid $100 each to attend. Members of the San Francisco Planning and Urban Research Association, to which Snellgrove has donated substantial amounts of money in the past, showed up to promote the project.

BEHIND THE SCENES

But the real action was behind the scenes.

Among those pushing hard for the project were Chinese Chamber of Commerce consultant Rose Pak and community organizer David Ho.

Pak’s support comes after Snellgrove spent years courting the increasingly powerful Chinatown activist, who played a leading role in the effort that got Ed Lee into the Mayor’s Office. Snellgrove has traveled to China with her — and will no doubt be coughing up some money for Pak’s efforts to rebuild Chinese Hospital.

Ho was all over City Hall and was taking the point on the lobbying efforts. Right around midnight, when the final vote was approaching, he entered the board chamber and followed one of Kim’s aides, Matthias Mormino, to the rail where Mormino delivered some documents to the supervisor. Several people who observed the incident told us Ho appeared to be talking Kim in an animated fashion.

Kim told me she didn’t actually speak to Ho at that point, although she’d talked to him at other times about the project, and that “nothing he could have said would have changed anything I did at that point anyway.” Matier and Ross in the San Francisco Chronicle reported that Ho was heard outside afterward saying “don’t worry, she’s fine.”

Matier and Ross have twice mentioned that the project will benefit “Chinatown nonprofits,” but there’s nothing in any public development document to support that assertion.

Chiu told me that no Chinese community leaders called him to urge support for 8 Washington. The money that goes into the affordable housing fund could go to the Chinatown Community Development Corp., where Ho works, but it’s hardly automatic — that money will go into a city fund and can’t be earmarked for any neighborhood or organization.

CCDC director Norman Fong confirmed to me that CCDC wasn’t supporting the project. In fact, Cindy Wu, a CCDC staffer who serves on the city Planning Commission, voted against 8 Washington.

The battle of 8 Washington – Page 3

Condos for millionaires approved with progressives split

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(22)

The condos at 8 Washington (center) would be the tallest buildings and the priciest housing along the waterfront

I couldn’t reach Ho to ask why he was working so hard on this deal. But one longtime political insider had a suggestion: “Sometimes it’s not about money, it’s about power. And if you want to have power, you need to win and prove you can win.”

Snellgrove will be sitting pretty if 8 Washington breaks ground. Since it’s a private deal (albeit in part on Port of San Francisco land) there’s no public record of how much money the developer stands to make. But Chiu pointed out during the meeting, and confirmed to me later by phone, that “there are only two data points we know.” One is that Snellgrow informed the Port that he expects to gross $470 million in revenue from selling the condos. The other is that construction costs are expected to come in at about $177 million. Even assuming $25 million in legal and other soft costs, that’s a huge profit margin.

And it suggests the he can well afford either to lower the heights — or, more important, to give the city a much sweeter benefits package. The affordable housing component could be tripled or quadrupled and Snellgrove’s development group would still realize far more return that even the most aggressive lenders demand.

Chiu said he’s disappointed but will continue working to improve the project. “While I was disappointed in the votes,” he said, “many of my colleagues expressed concerns about height, parking, and affordable housing fees that they can address in the upcoming project approvals.”

So what does this mean for the fall elections? It may not be a huge deal — the symbolism of 8 Washington is powerful, but if it’s built, it won’t, by itself, directly change the lives of people in Olague’s District 5 or Mar’s District 1. Certainly the vote on CPMC will have a larger, more lasting impact on the city. Labor’s support for Mar could be a huge factor, and his willingness to break with other progressives to give the building trades a favor could help him with money and organizing efforts. On the other hand, some of Olague’s opponents will use this to differentiate themselves from the incumbent. John Rizzo, who has been running in D5 for almost a year now, told me he strongly opposed 8 Washington. “It’s a clear-cut issue for me, the wrong project and a bad deal for the city.” London Breed, a challenger who is more conservative, told us: “I would not have supported this project,” she said, arguing that the zoning changes set a bad precedent for the waterfront. “There are so many reasons why it shouldn’t have happened,” she said. And while Mar is in a more centrist district, support from the left was critical in his last grassroots campaign. This won’t cost him votes against a more conservative opponent — but if it costs him enthusiasm, that could be just as bad.

Comments

Such a sad sorry broken record. Build absolutely nothing anywhere near anything.
If we absolutely have to allow something to be built, we must extort as much money as possible from the developer (even though those costs are just transferred back to the buyer) or we must knock a story or two off the building.

What do you people have to offer San Francisco other than being the token opposition to everything proposed?

Posted by Greg2 on May. 23, 2012 @ 9:51 am

irrelevant. Opponents of this development are the same few dozen activists who show up for many of these meetings. Attend any city meeting and, if you believe only the crowd, you’d think this city is well to the left of Lenin.

The simple fact is that most residents don’t have a few hours to spare, especially during the day, to attend these borefests. The supes know that and routinely ignore the speakers. I actually feel sorry for them having to listen to hours of this droning before they can actually make the important decisions.

As for 8-Wash, I suspect 8/11 of the city residents want a prime architectural jewel to bedeck our waterfront, and want the jobs, tax dollars and affordable housing setasides that comes with it.

Again that, ideological whimpering by the usual suspect NIMBY’s doesn’t really matter.

Posted by Guest on May. 23, 2012 @ 10:09 am

If you think this is going to be an “architectural jewel” you may want to look at the video that the Planning Department commissioned to show what the project would look like (see YouTube, “We Tore Down the Embarcadero Freeway for This!”). The project narrows the sidewalk along Embarcadero from current 16′ down to 15′. The sidewalk along the Embarcadero in front of Sue Bierman park, one block south, is actually 18′ wide. The devil is in the details.

The much touted Jackson Court, which extends Jackson to The Embarcadero, allows the bulky residential towers to project 10-12 feet into the public right of way. If this project ever gets built, you may be surprised by what it actually looks like, particularly after the design gets ‘value engineered’ to reduce construction costs.

Posted by Guest on May. 24, 2012 @ 10:27 am

Let me know when someone even notices or cares.

Posted by Guest on May. 24, 2012 @ 5:03 pm

If you think this is going to be an “architectural jewel” you may want to look at the video that the Planning Department commissioned to show what the project would look like (see YouTube, “We Tore Down the Embarcadero Freeway for This!”). The project narrows the sidewalk along Embarcadero from current 16′ down to 15′. The sidewalk along the Embarcadero in front of Sue Bierman park, one block south, is actually 18′ wide. The devil is in the details.

The much touted Jackson Court, which extends Jackson to The Embarcadero, allows the bulky residential towers to project 10-12 feet into the public right of way. If this project ever gets built, you may be surprised by what it actually looks like, particularly after the design gets ‘value engineered’ to reduce construction costs.

Posted by Guest on May. 24, 2012 @ 10:29 am

If you think this is going to be an “architectural jewel” you may want to look at the video that the Planning Department commissioned to show what the project would look like (see YouTube, “We Tore Down the Embarcadero Freeway for This!”). The project narrows the sidewalk along Embarcadero from current 16′ down to 15′. The sidewalk along the Embarcadero in front of Sue Bierman park, one block south, is actually 18′ wide. The devil is in the details.

The much touted Jackson Court, which extends Jackson to The Embarcadero, allows the bulky residential towers to project 10-12 feet into the public right of way. If this project ever gets built, you may be surprised by what it actually looks like, particularly after the design gets ‘value engineered’ to reduce construction costs.

Posted by Guest on May. 24, 2012 @ 10:29 am

If you think this is going to be an “architectural jewel” you may want to look at the video that the Planning Department commissioned to show what the project will look like (see YouTube, “We Tore Down the Embarcadero Freeway for This!”). The project narrows the sidewalk along Embarcadero from current 16′ down to 15′. The sidewalk along the Embarcadero in front of Sue Bierman park, one block south, is actually 18′ wide. The devil is in the details.

The much touted Jackson Court, which extends Jackson to The Embarcadero, allows the bulky residential towers to project 10 feet into the public right of way. If this project ever gets built, you may be surprised by what it actually looks like, particularly after the design gets ‘value engineered’ to reduce construction costs.

Posted by Brad Paul on May. 24, 2012 @ 10:33 am

It’s, like, so much more persuasive that way.

Posted by Guest on May. 24, 2012 @ 5:03 pm

How can anyone possibly call this ugly boxy monstrosity an “architectual jewel”?!?!

Posted by Guest on May. 25, 2012 @ 10:08 am

that is hoping to be marketed to high-value buyers will look like crap.

I propose that you divorce form from substance. If this were a new center for the homeless, or a medical pot dispensary, you’d probably be singing its praises.

Class envy has no place in architectural critiques.

Posted by Guest on May. 25, 2012 @ 11:29 am

These people are so incredibly myopic and selfish.

Myopic because they obviously don’t understand what 1% means. If you create more housing it’s not like there’s more 1%. It’s a fixed ratio of people, meaning, if they buy at 8 Washington they probably won’t buy somewhere else. Inventory opens up elsewhere, where it’s more affordable based on market demand. That’s a free market folks.

Selfish because they’re obviously protecting their own best interests. They could care less about affordable housing. If they did, they’d want to see more housing inventory. Let’s see if they prefer an exclusively low income development next door.

As for “too bulky”, I don’t know what to say. Give me a break. You live in the heart of one of the most dense areas in the state, if not country. If you want quaint, you’re in the wrong place.

Posted by Guest on May. 23, 2012 @ 11:45 am

What are you talking about? If we cannot afford the $3 million to buy one of the 143 apartments at 8 Washington, what makes you think we will be able to afford the former homes of the new buyers? These apartments are for the richest of the rich. They will contribute nothing to the city. They are not providing jobs (except for their poor servants). The probably own several homes and will not spend much time here.

The trickled down theory has been discredited. The city’s plan admits we have an affordable housing crisis and yet they build luxury housing? We need smart development not shortsighted gifts to their political donors.

Posted by Sigmarlin on May. 24, 2012 @ 4:29 pm
MANY OF THE COMMENTS ON THIS POST, LIKE THIS ONE, ARE OBVIOUSLY MADE BY CORPORATE TOOLS
Tim, the fact that “two to one” at the meeting opposed it is

Mirrelevant. Opponents of this development are the same few dozen activists who show up for many of these meetings. Attend any city meeting and, if you believe only the crowd, you’d think this city is well to the left of Lenin.

The simple fact is that most residents don’t have a few hours to spare, especially during the day, to attend these borefests. The supes know that and routinely ignore the speakers. I actually feel sorry for them having to listen to hours of this droning before they can actually make the important decisions.

As for 8-Wash, I suspect 8/11 of the city residents want a prime architectural jewel to bedeck our waterfront, and want the jobs, tax dollars and affordable housing setasides that comes with it.

Again that, ideological whimpering by the usual suspect NIMBY’s doesn’t really matter.

The top 2% pay 50% of all taxes, according to the IRS. Plus all the sales tax and jobs their spending creates. That’s why every city on the planet tries to attract them and SF doesn’t even really have to try. Do you have any idea what an incredible benefit that is?

And if I pay a million or two for a new condo, then I’m not buying a condo in SOMA, which means the next leg down the hierarchy can, which means they are not competing for that TIC in the Mission that you want. And so on.

That’s the funny thing about the free market. It works, like an invisible hand, without some faceless over-paid city bureaucrat in a cheap suit meddling at all.

Posted by Guest on May. 24, 2012 @ 5:02 pm

The laws of supply and demand are held in abeyance by the Progressive school. Tim explained their platform in an earlier post. That the people who would live in 8 Washington would NOT otherwise buy an expensive condo in Soma. He seems to believe that they would not live in San Francisco if not for 8 Washington. I remember, in one of the highlights of the post, he calculated the environmental cost of them flying here once a month from New York in their private jets, all because of 8 Washington (I’m serious, I’m not making that up. Search for it).

And your economic arguments are quite logical but the Progressive movement has no innate interest in the tax revenue that the rich pay, other than that they want to spend it on social engineering. If the wealthy could just mail in checks from New York or the Caymans without actually owning property here the Progressives would be perfectly happy.

Posted by Troll on May. 24, 2012 @ 7:42 pm

One might ask, “why would I vote to re-elect a Supervisor who, even though they know a deal is completely out of compliance with zoning laws and the public trust, does not fundamentally support the deal and which may even be something their “normal” constituency does not support, vote for it anyway?”. I don’t’ want to vote for a Supervisor who is weak, and stands for nothing at all.

Thanks to Chiu, Avalos and Campos for doing the right thing for the City.

Posted by Guest observer on May. 23, 2012 @ 3:15 pm

vote the exact opposite, and support a project that will bring vital tax dollars to the city.

Envy is not a viable political strategy.

Posted by Guest on May. 24, 2012 @ 5:05 pm

>”I didn’t count every single speaker, but it’s fair to say sentiment was about 2-1 against the 8 Washington project.”

Several of us pointed out last time that the opponents of the project were allowed to speak in a time slot that ended around 8PM. The proponents of the project didn’t get a chance to speak until about 11:30PM, on a Tuesday night. Many people obviously had to leave the Civic Center area as midnight was approaching.

I just point this out in case there is anyone new out there reading this who might falsely assume that Tim Redmond is an honest journalist. He is not. He’s aware of this significant factor that dampened the opponents response but deliberately ignored it because it didn’t suit his agenda.

Just a reminder to everyone — Redmond is pure propaganda, you’ll see for yourself if you read this stuff for awhile. Good for a laugh now and then but if you are looking for information to base an opinion on you obviously need to look elsewhere.

Posted by Troll on May. 24, 2012 @ 11:05 am

against this project shows that even the “usual suspect” activists were struggling to get any numbers out to oppose this.

Frankly, I don’t even know why the supes have to vote on every new building. A bigger city would surely delegate such low-level decisions to those with expertise in building and development.

Posted by Guest on May. 24, 2012 @ 5:07 pm

I’m more concerned about the sleazy, rent-a-mob corporate lobbyists and corporate hacks and their corrupt politicians working for the 1% for their right-wing elitist agenda (they call it “moderate” to deceive people). I appreciate the “usual suspect” activists who are part of the 99%. They are not usually bought-off through corruption.

Posted by Guest on May. 24, 2012 @ 6:19 pm

In small town San Francisco, the people with the “expertise” are the endless neighborhood groups who have to make sure that nothing changes ever. We’re provincial and we know it.

Posted by Greg on May. 24, 2012 @ 5:41 pm

parochialism and provincialism more than the way any and very new building is considered “controversial”, requiring endless debate.

Just build the damn thing. The natives will always find something else to whine about.

Posted by Guest on May. 25, 2012 @ 11:31 am

But you’re whining too….about the “natives.”

That’s called being a hypocrite.

Posted by Guest on May. 25, 2012 @ 2:13 pm

Is Scott Weiner a Developer's Tool?

 

 

Scott Wiener goes after historic preservation | SF Politics

 

 

 

 

 

Housing for the super rich approved, 8-3

 

 The two defining votes of 2012



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Browse the Online Archive of California

 

via Online Archive of California.

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Mission Mission: Donate to help vandalized Mission Businesses

As you already know, a bunch of local businesses were vandalized last night, causing what could be upwards of thousands of dollars in damage. An anonymous community member has stepped up and started a donation page, and 100% of the funds collected will go toward helping repair the businesses that were affected in last night’s riots.These businesses include but may not be limited to:

Brick and Mortar

Taca Airlines

299 Valencia

Tradesmen

Property Management Systems

The Voyager Shop

Four Barrel

Pica Pica Maize Kitchen

Art Zone 461 Gallery

Locanda

Bar Tartine

Therapy

Weston Wears

Mission Police Station

FarinaTartine

[Photo via Mission Local]

via Mission Mission.

Kick Off Spring with These Three Art Shows | 7×7

Kick Off Spring with These Three Art Shows

Katharina Wulff, Die Verbindung (The Connection), 2008; oil on canvas;

48 1/16 x 68 7/8 in. (122 x 175 cm); Olbricht Collection; © Katharina

Wulff

The city’s museums now have their major exhibitions out and swinging (you’ve seen Foto Mexico and Gaultier; the ads plastered over town are maybe coaxing a return visit) and the gallery circuit is on the cusp of exploding into a big spring season. Our suggestion: take this weekend to explore some of the Bay’s slightly smaller, considerably less hyped, but no doubt equally fascinating museum shows. Here are three picks.

New Work: Katharina Wulff at SFMOMA

Katharina Wulff is unmistakably contemporary in how freely she channels the modern. Befitting for an institution that hangs the likes of Matisse and Dalí, Wulff’s whimsical and captivating paintings are at turns Fauvist, Surrealist and Dada. The whole of art history is the Moroccan-based artist’s playground.

Consisting of twenty works, this showing marks the artist’s first ever solo exhibition in the U.S., and, more importantly, her west coast debut. What can you expect? Much in the way of fantastical landscapes, confused perspective, bizarre-looking animals and still more bizarre-looking people. They brim with color and intrigue, never staying too long in any one place.

Katharina Wulff runs through September 4, 2012, at SFMOMA, 151 3rd Street

Modern Cartoonist: The Art of Daniel Clowes at Oakland Museum of California

Don’t call them comic books. The twenty first century graphic novel has elevated the panel-illustrated narrative to unprecedented heights. It’s been a thrilling and lucrative progression, and Oakland’s own Daniel Clowes has been at the forefront from the beginning. Some accounts would place this remarkably gifted illustrator, who has over fifty publications under his belt as well as an academy award nomination for screenplay, as the genre’s reigning patriarch.

The OMCA’s sprawling, installation-based show marks the first major survey of Clowe’s work to date. Complete with original drawings, artifacts and an extensive full-color monograph, this form of recognition is long overdue.

Modern Cartoonist runs through August 24, 2012, at Oakland Museum of California, 1000 Oak Street

Femmescapes at Mills College Art Museum

Femmescapes at Mills College Art Museum

A group of Mills College students were given a pretty amazing opportunity: to freely mine Lenore Pereira and Rich Niles’ marvelous collection of contemporary work by women artists. With names like Louise Bourgeois, Ann Hamilton and Francesca Woodman on the roster, this is a trove that many professional curators would probably kill for a chance to have at.

The resulting exhibition, Femmescapes, explores the various conceptual and metaphorical intertwinings of femininity and environment – nature as a woman, woman as land (lush, fertile, barren, etc.), body as landscape. Featuring about 40 works of painting, video, photography and sculpture, this is a unique glimpse not to be missed.

Femmescapes is on view Saturdays and Sundays only, through May 6, at 70 South Park

via Kick Off Spring with These Three Art Shows | 7×7.

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S.F. Bay Guardian Announcement: Brugmann Stepping Down, Headquarters Sold For $6.5 Million

S.F. Bay Guardian Announcement: Brugmann Stepping Down, Headquarters Sold For $6.5 Million

 

sfbg_hq2.jpg
Guardian HQ, via Street View

 

In an official announcement today, San Francisco Bay Guardian Executive Editor Tim Redmond cleared up some of the the rumors swirling around the will-they/won’t-they hookup situation between the Guardian and the San Francisco Examiner. The biggest take aways: longtime publishers Bruce Brugmann and Jean Dibble will be stepping down from their day-to-day operations as they cash in on the sale of the paper’s Potrero Hill headquarters.

Helping out Boss Brugmann and his wife as they sunset their way to retirement, San Francisco real estate investment firm Union Property Capital has agreed to pay $6.5 million for the paper’s HQ on Mississippi Street. That price tag is just under $2 million more than Brugmann paid for the 27,000 square-foot building back in 2002 using Small Business loans to make the down payment. The deal was reportedly made off the market.

Although Examiner Publisher Todd Vogt was originally being coy about the sale, he explained to Redmond, “Bruce and Jean have created a legendary publication, and we are happy to be able to give it a new home and the chance to continue its mission.” The Ex and the SFBG will remain separate and distinct papers, but Vogt did point out that, “the potential synergies will be beneficial to readers and advertisers.”

Redmond also explained the paper’s plan for the future and his own expanded role:

This transition is connected to ongoing exclusive negotiations with a subsidiary of The SF Newspaper Company LLC to purchase all assets related to the the Guardian publishing operations. SFNalso owns and publishes the San Francisco Examiner. Both parties are optimistic that a final contract will be signed shortly, most likely in May. 

There are no plans to change the editorial content or positions of the Guardian, which will remain the voice of progressive politics and alternative culture in San Francisco. Executive Editor Tim Redmond will stay on in the expanded role of executive editor and publisher.

 

Brugmann, meanwhile, will continue keeping up the Bruce Blog for the foreseeable future.

Previously: SF Examiner Just Bought SF Bay Guardian?

Contact the author of this article or email tips@sfist.com with further questions, comments or tips.
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