Category Archives: The Richmond

San Francisco — the Good Stuff!!!

DISCOVER SAN FRANCISCO From Sparkletack

 

San Francisco History, Photo Archives, Map Archives, Walking Tours, Museums, Online Resources, Running Tours and Historical Organizations

History Resources
  • April 18, 1906“Exploring San Francisco’s 1906 earthquake and fire through the photographic archive” — A new and interesting project, which pulls out individual period photos and digs in deep.
  • Bay Time Reporter
    A series of smart, funny and insightful columns on a staggering array of Bay Area historical (and contemporary) subjects, written by the inimitable Paul Potocky. Highly recommended… the man can write.
  • California Business History
    Don’t be put off by the awkward design; this site is actually packed with timelines, photographs and histories of California (and San Francisco) businesses.
  • California Historical Society
    The grand-daddy of California history in its physical incarnation, the Society’s website features an online guide to over 300 years of California history. This resource includes over 400 images from their fine arts, library, and photography collections.
  • Library of Congress
    The “American Memory Project” — just type “San Francisco” into the search bar and jump back at the flood of photos and historical artifacts… this is the Library of Congress, after all!
  • Market Street Railway
    All things “streetcar”, packed with historical articles and photos — the home of the brand new “San Francisco Railway Museum”
  • Mister SF
    Long time chronicler of the city’s faces and places. This website features countless short takes on aspects of life in our favourite city — local joints, the vanishing of favourite haunts, literary/cinematic history and more.
  • Online Archive of California
    A part of the “Digital Library of California” — over 1,000 texts available. These include transcripts of oral histories, personal narratives, letters, press releases, newspaper articles, and other types of documents.
  • Russian Hill Neighbors
    Small site — couple of nice walking tours and a guide to neighborhood architectural styles, run by a non-profit neighborhood association.
  • San Francisco Genealogy
    An incredibly rich and comprehensive collection of historical sources — always my first stop on quests for information. Many primary sources, maps, and a forum where host Ron Filion helps answer your San Francisco history questions.
  • San Francisco Memories
    A loving tribute to our fair city from a passionate collector of San Francisco ephemera — photo intensive and quite lovely.
  • San Francisco Virtual Museum
    A long running and deep archive dedicated to historical accuracy, curated by the energetic Gladys Hanson. A terrific source for primary texts & photos, currently featuring major exhibits on the Gold Rush, Golden Gate Bridge, and ’06 Quake.
  • The Western Neighborhoods Project
    “Preserving the history of San Francisco’s West side” — An excellent site featuring photos, memories, and passionately in-depth essays documenting the lesser-known half of San Francisco.

Historical Photo & Map Archives

  • America Hurrah!
    A little treasure trove of California historiana with a San Francisco slant — click on a link and a map, reminiscence, or who knows what may result. Good fun…
  • April 18, 1906
    “Exploring San Francisco’s 1906 earthquake and fire through the photographic archive” — A new and interesting project, which pulls out individual period photos and digs in deep.
  • Calisphere – University of California
    A part of the “Digital Library of California” — More than 150,000 digitized items, including photographs, documents, political cartoons, works of art, diaries, advertising, and more…
  • Charles Cushman Photograph Collection
    Charles Cushman, amateur photographer, bequeathed 14,500 Kodachrome color slides to Indiana University. Hundreds are of San Francisco in the ’30s, ’40s, and ’50s.
  • Old SF
    Interactive map of the SF Public Library’s Historical Photograph Collection, which contains 40,000 digitized images from San Francisco’s past.
  • Online Archive of California
    A part of the “Digital Library of California” — access to tens of thousands of photographs, paintings, graphical materials and other images, which can be organized by topic.
  • Rails Around the Bay
    Frank Caron is an Amtrak engineer and passionate rail buff. His website focuses on railroads operating in and around the greater San Francisco Bay Area, including the history of operations in the area, maps, drawings and historical diagrams.
  • Rumsey Historic Map Collection
    This stunning collection of cartographic ephemera from the 18th and 19th centuries includes atlases, globes, school geographies, books, maritime charts, and more. Insanely cool.
  • SF Images
    Images of the past and present day, people and places, structures and landscapes. Large collection of historical photographs, from pre-Gold Rush times to today, all digitally mastered at high resolution.

San Francisco Walking  and Running Tours

  • Barbary Coast Trail
    The famous self-guided walking tour — follow the bronze medallions in the sidewalk!
  • Oakland Walking Tours
    Free walking tours of historic downtown Oakland — explore the Railroad Era, Chinatown, Art Deco Uptown, the Jack London Waterfront, Preservation Park and so much more. Sponsored by the City of Oakland.
  • San Francisco Tour Guide Guild
    “A professional, non-profit corporation of experienced tour guides and members of the travel industry.” They maintain the prefessionalism of the industry through tour guide certification, but also offer their own tours.
  • Walking in San Francisco for Health and History
    “Meet other locals interested in walking for fitness and in learning about the history of San Francisco. Most Saturdays we go on long walks that have great variety in distance, stair climbing, and amount of history information. Walks are free.”
  • Explore SF
    Explore SF offers unique tours that from a local perspective that for the most part avoid anything touristy. Each tour offers something above and beyond a normal tour, be it  lunch and a spa visit in Japantown,  Wine Country in the City,  1970’s Folsom District Tour, Sin Francisco to the SF Armory or a WIld Parrot Safari, “These tours are not to be missed.”

  • SF Scenic Running ToursThe newest trend in staying in shape and meeting new people. Running
    tours led by professional trainers and experienced guides, all of whom are
    locals, and they take you on the most beautiful runs through the most
    breathtaking city in the world. We challenge you to find a more positive way to see San Francisco. If you can find one, we’ll pay your way…

San Francisco Museums and Archives

  • Bancroft Library
    California’s memory bank on the UC Berkeley campus, one of the largest special collections in the U.S. Includes the Mark Twain Papers, Regional Oral History Office, UC Archives, History of Science & Technology Program, & Pictorial Collection.
  • San Francisco Performing Arts Library & Museum
    Documenting and preserving the Bay Area’s rich performing arts heritage from the Gold Rush to today – and making it available to us! Programs, events, exhibitions, and the fabulous library. Based on dancer Russell Hartley’s private collection, ca 1947.
  • Treasure Island Museum
    Once upon a time there was a museum on Treasure Island. Someday it may return, but ’til then, enjoy the museum’s website, featuring a “Memory Book” message board, info about the collections in storage, and “Treasures”, an illustrated history of the Fair.
  • Wells Fargo History MuseumThis colorful museum features a beautiful stagecoach, piles of real gold, and many other exhibits focusing on San Francisco’s Gold Rush history. Even cooler, it’s located on the very spot in which Wells Fargo opened for business in 1852!

Contemporary Online San Francisco

  • FunCheap SF
    “Finding fun and cheap stuff to do San Francisco and around the Bay Area.” Yahoo group dedicated to having fun in the Bay Area on the cheap. Good stuff!
  • San Francisco Virtual Tour
    “An interactive photo documentary Walking Virtual Tour” — and that’s just what we have here, a staggering amount of work. Kudos!
  • SF Journey (German language)
    A German-language travel guide to San Francisco and the West Coast: “Ihrem Reiseführer nach San Francisco an der Westküste der USA”
  • Wells Fargo History Museum
    This colorful museum features a beautiful stagecoach, piles of real gold, and many other exhibits focusing on San Francisco’s Gold Rush history. Even cooler, it’s located on the very spot in which Wells Fargo opened for business in 1852!

San Francisco History Organizations

  • San Francisco History Association
    A group “Dedicated to Remembering San Francisco’s Past” — they sponsor regular talks, slide shows, and guest speakers on a fantastically diverse array of subjects.
  • San Francisco Gay and Lesbian Historical Society
    Often referred to as San Francisco’s “queer Smithsonian,” the GLBT Historical Society houses one of the world’s largest collections of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender historical materials. The society’s GLBT History Museum is the first full-scale, stand-alone museum of its kind in the United States.
  • San Francisco History Museum and Historical Society
    The San Francisco Museum and Historical Society is dedicated to preserving, interpreting and presenting the historical heritage of San Francisco.

  • Treasure Island Museum
    Once upon a time there was a museum on Treasure Island. Someday it may return, but ’til then, enjoy the museum’s website, featuring a “Memory Book” message board, info about the collections in storage, and “Treasures”, an illustrated history of the Fair.
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Five Beautiful Places to See a California Sunset and One Great Place to Run…

 

Five Beautiful Places to See a California Sunset and One Great Place to Run…

Five Beautiful Places to See a California Sunset

Photo via jonathandinh on Flickr.com

Theres a certain wonder from watching a sunset that captures our imaginations. You don’t hear people going around loathing about what an eyesore sunsets are. But as timeless and universal as they are, there are some destinations that just seem to have better sunsets than others. With miles of expansive coastline along the Pacific Coast, the argument could be made that California is one of those places. Today I spotlight five of the most beautiful places to watch the sunset in California.

 

Pfeiffer Beach, Big Sur. With such a dramatic coastline, its hard to narrow down Big Sur to just one  locale to view the sunset. Pfeiffer Beach may be one of the more challenging places to access on this list, but I believe you’ll like the view youre greeted with. Keep your eyes peeled though, as the turnoff for Pfeiffer Beach comes up quickly off the Pacific Coast Highway, and then you have to drive down a narrow road for what seems like miles until you arrive at public parking for the beach. Whats so unique about Pfeiffer Beach is the large rock that sits just beyond the crashing waves. Its no ordinary Pacific Coast rock, but has a large opening at the bottom that the sun shines through before it drops behind the horizon.

 

Malibu Pier, Malibu. No, not Santa Monica Pier, but Malibu Pier. You’ll have to head just a little further up the coastline to Malibu for this pier. There are tons of popular piers up and down the coastline near L.A., but many of them get busy during the summer months and don’t exactly have the serenity that you’ve probably come to expect from sunsets. While Malibu Pier can in fact get busy during the summer months, its somewhat of a California icon. Visitors can enjoy a leisurely walk down the pier at sunset or photography lovers can set up on the beach to snap sunset photos with the pier in the foreground.

 

The Presidio, San Francisco. Its hard to believe that such wilderness and natural beauty is so close to downtown San Francisco. Occupying a large portion of the tip of the San Francisco Peninsula, there are several great spots in the Presidio to watch the sunset, including Crissy Field, which provides a view of the sun setting behind the Golden Gate Bridge. However, my favorite is around the bend near Baker Beach along the Batteries to Bluffs Trail. Visitors can find a rock along the trail or sit atop one of the military batteries while watching the sunset straight ahead across the Pacific Ocean. This also provides great views of the Golden Gate Bridge.

 

 


How to run to The Presidio: 
A great way to see The Presidio, San Francisco is on a running tour with SF Scenic Running Tours. These runs have grown in popularity as more people find out about  the natural beauty that exists in San Francisco. One person on a recent running tour was quoted as saying that she thought it was the most fantastic run she had ever been on and found it hard to believe she was still in San Francisco. “They showed us places we never would have found on our own”, she continued. SF Scenic Running Tours can be found here. Their tours can even be taken in combination with Alcatraz Tours. Many people across the nation have started taking running tours as a way to meet people while keeping fit. “Running was such a solitary activity for me until I started these fantastic tours”, said Lisa, “Now I know lots of people in the city and am more fit than I was in my early 20’s!”

Carmel Beach, Carmel. Carmel Beach is one of California’s most popular beaches and for good reason. Its just blocks from downtown Carmel and features a long, dramatic and rugged coastline that looks out over Carmel Bay. Heres your chance to impress that special someone. On a clear night, arrive early and grab a spot south of 10th Avenue and light a bonfire. Grab a bottle of wine and chocolate and marshmallows for smores, but dont forget a blanket as the chill and wind picks up as the sun starts to set.

 

 

  

Joshua Tree National Park, Joshua Tree. While beach sunsets are a California icon, I couldn’t talk sunsets and not mention at least one destination that is further inland. While you wont see the sun setting over the large expanse of the Pacific Ocean, what you will instead see is a vast sky gleaming with bright colors for as far as the eye can see and no sights or sounds to interrupt it. Sunsets here are  expansive and offer a sense of serenity that the other places on this list dont quite produce. For a more perched view above the park, take the turn-off on the northwestern side of the park for Keys View.By Spencer Spellman on May 31, 2012 2:00 PMunder Travel

via Five Beautiful Places to See a California Sunset | 7×7.

Related Links:

Scenic Running

SF Scenic Running

 

 

SF Scenic Running Tours

 

 

Alcatraz and Presidio

Alcatraz with Presidio Run

 

 

Explore Alcatraz with Presidio Run

Explore SF
Explore San Francisco

 

 

 

Explore San Francisco

 

 

Explore Alcatraz Tour Packages

Explore Alcatraz Tour Packages

 

 

Explore Alcatraz Tour Packages

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About Old S.F.

 

About Old S.F. (One our favorite sites here at ExploreSF)

Disclaimer: I am not affiliated with the San Francisco Public Library in any way.

This site provides an alternative way of browsing the SFPL‘s incredible San Francisco Historical
Photograph Collection
. Its goal is to help you discover the history
behind the places you see every day.

And, if you’re lucky, maybe you’ll even discover something about San Francisco’s rich past that you never knew before!

Where did these images come from?

The images all come from the San Francisco Public Library’s San Francisco Historical
Photograph Collection
. They were culled from many sources, including the
now-defunct San
Francisco News-Call Bulletin
.

The Library retains the copyright for many of these images. For details,
please read their Permissions page and FAQ.

The creators of this site did not collect or digitize any of these images
— credit for that massive undertaking belongs entirely to the
Library.

Who built this site?

The site was built by @danvdk and designed by @ravejk.Nob Hill 1896

What did this site do?

The creators of this site associated latitudes and longitudes to the images in
the San Francisco Historical Photograph Collection at the San Francisco Public Library, located in the Main Branch on the 6th floor. This process is known as geocoding. Doing this
allows the images to be placed at points on a map, which enables new ways of
exploring this collection.

 

How were they geocoded?

The geocodes are based on two sources:

  1. Photo Subjects. All photographs in the “City Hall (old)”
    series presumably belong in the same place. We manually geocoded several
    hundred subjects.
  2. Addresses and Cross-Streets. The photo descriptions often contain
    either an address, block number or set of cross-streets. These were
    converted to coordinates using the Google
    Geocoding API
    .

What’s the story of this project?

1945-1

Several years ago, I searched for my cross-streets
on the Library’s San Francisco Historical Photograph Collection and found the
photo on the right. The image was mislabeled — the intersection in the
foreground is actually Waller and Fillmore, not Waller and Webster. Which
meant that this photo from 1945 was taken from my roof!

I put together a now-and-then
shot, but it always bothered me that the mislabeling of the image was so
crucial to my finding it. This led to the idea of putting the images on a
map.

And now, years later, we have that map!

What fraction of the images have been geocoded?

The library’s collection contains about 40,000 images. Many of these
photographs have little geographic context (e.g. they’re portraits) and
cannot be located. In all, about 20,000 of the images could be placed on aHaight- Ashbury Hippies  during the 1967 Summer of Love San Francisco, Ca
map. We’ve geocoded about 65% of the possible images: 13,000.

How can you help?

If you’re technically minded, here’s a JSON file containing all the image
descriptions, as well as geocodes for the records on the map (including the
reason I thought they were at that location): records.js.zip (2MB download).
If you improve on my geocoding or do something else interesting with the data,
please share your results!

via About Old S.F..

 

 

 

 

To see this collection in person or to order reprints please come to The San Francisco Library, Main Branch, 100 Larkin Street, San Francisco, CA 94102 Telephone (415) 557-4567, email: info@sfpl.org
The San Francisco Historical Photograph Collection, located in the San Francisco History Center on the 6th floor, contains photographs and works on paper of San Francisco and California views from 1850 to the present. The Collection is open to the public on Tuesdays and Thursdays from 1-5 and Saturdays 10-12 & 1-5

More about the collection

Explore the Library’s Geocoded Images On Old S.F.!

Two Construction Workers on the Golden Gate Bridge

 

Two construction workers on the Golden Gate Bridge

Date
September 18, 1935
Photo ID#
AAD-0884



About the Photo Collection

Photo Collection

The San Francisco Historical Photograph Collection contains photographs and works on papers of San Francisco and California scenes ranging from 1850 to the present. This collection includes views of San Francisco street scenes, buildings, and neighborhoods, as well as photographs of famous San Francisco personalities. The collection consists mostly of the photo morgue of the San Francisco News-Call Bulletin, a daily newspaper, ranging from 1920s to 1965. The collection also contains albums, slides, postcards, cabinet cards, stereoviews, and lantern slides of San Francisco and California subjects.

Copies of images may be ordered with the Reproduction of Images Form (PDF 31K). Many of the photographs are available for commercial use when a Permission to Publish Form (PDF 40K) has been submitted.

The collection may be viewed in two ways: through the online database on the San Francisco Public Library website, which contains 40,000 digitized images from the San Francisco Historical Photograph Collection, or in person during photo desk open hours.

Looking up in the atrium of the main branch of...

Looking up in the atrium of the main branch of the San Francisco Public Library, San Francisco, California, USA. (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

When viewing the collection in person, only a limited number of photographs may be examined at one time. Library users will be provided with gloves to wear while examining the photographs. The photographs are to be handled by the edges only and held securely on two sides. The following items are not to be used in contact with the photographs: pressure sensitive tapes, all types of glues, paper clips, elastic bands, staples, pins, pens or pencils. Photocopying of photographs is harmful to the image and is not allowed. Photographs may be reproduced through a photo lab of the Library’s choice, through the Library scanning service or through a scheduled photo shoot. See Order Images for details.

For further information about the San Francisco Historical Photograph Collection please call 415-557-4567 during open hours.

via About the Photo Collection :: San Francisco Public Library.

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Spring fairs and festivals | SF Bay Guardian

Spring fairs and festivals

The Bay’s got it all, from garlic to tango fests — here’s your handy guide to spring happenings

03.20.12 – 5:39 pm | Ali Lane | (0)

 

Trash Mash-Up is just one of the colorful crewes to hold down SF‘s Carnaval (May 26-27)

PHOTO VIA TRASH MASH-UP

culture@sfbg.com

MARCH

SF Flower and Garden Show, San Mateo Event Center, 495 S. Delaware, San Mateo. (415) 684-7278, http://www.sfgardenshow.com. March 21-25, 10am-6pm, $15–$65, free for 16 and under. This year’s theme is “Gardens for a Green Earth,” and features a display garden demonstrating conservation practices and green design. Plant yourself here for thriving leafy greens, food, and fun in the sun.

 

The Art of Aging Gracefully Resource Fair, Jewish Community Center of San Francisco, 3200 California, SF. (415) 292-1200, http://www.jccsf.org. March 22, 9:30am-2:45pm, free. Treat yourself kindly with presentations by UCSF Medical Center professionals on healthy living, sample classes, health screenings, massages, giveaways and raffles.

 

California’s Artisan Cheese Festival, Sheraton Sonoma County, 745 Sherwood, Petaluma. (707) 283-2888, http://www.artisancheesefestival.com. March 23-25, $20–$135. Finally, a weekend given over to the celebration of cultures: semi-soft, blue, goat, and cave-aged. More than a dozen award-winning cheesemakers will provide hors d’oeuvres and educational seminars.

 

15th Annual Rhone Rangers Grand Tasting, Fort Mason Festival Pavilion, Buchanan and Marina, SF. (800) 467-0163, http://www.rhonerangers.org. March 24-25, $45–$185. The largest American Rhone wine event in the country, with over 2,000 attendees tasting 500 of the best Rhones from its 100 US member wineries.

 

Whiskies of the World Expo, Hornblower Yacht, Pier 3, SF. (408) 225-0446, http://www.whiskiesoftheworld.com. March 31, 6pm-9pm, $120–$150. The expo attracts over 1400 guests intent on sampling spirits on a yacht and meeting important personages from this fine whiskey world of ours.

 

Bay Area Anarchist Book Fair, SF County Fair Building’s Hall of Flowers, Golden Gate Park, SF. (415) 431-8355, bayareaanarchistbookfair.wordpress.com. March 31-April 1, free. This political book fair brings together radical booksellers, distributors, independent presses, and political groups from around the world.

 

Monterey Jazz Festival‘s Next Generation Festival Monterey Conference Center, One Portola Plaza, Monterey. (831) 373-3366, http://www.montereyjazzfestival.org. March 30-April 1, free. 1200 student-musicians from schools located everywhere from California to Japan compete for the chance to perform at the big-daddy Monterey Jazz Festival. Free to the public, come to cheer on the 47 California ensembles who will be playing, or pick an away team favorite.

 

APRIL

Argentine Tango Festival, San Francisco Airport Marriot Hotel, 1800 Old Bayshore Highway, Burlingame. http://www.argentinetangousa.com. April 5-8, $157–$357. Grip that rose tightly with your molars — it’s time to take the chance to dance in one of 28 workshops, with a live tango orchestra, and tango DJs. The USA Tango championship is also taking place here.

 

Salsa Festival, The Westin Market Street, 50 Third St., SF. (415) 974-6400. http://www.sfsalsafestival.com. April 5-7, $75–$125. Three nights of world-class performances, dancing, competition and workshops with top salsa instructors.

www.sresproductions.com/union_street_easter. April 8, 10am-5pm, parade at 2pm, free. A family festival with kids rides and games, a petting zoo, and music.

45th Annual Northern California Cherry Blossom Festival, Japan Center, Post and Buchanan, SF. (415) 567-4573, www.sfjapantown.org. April 14-15 and 21-22, parade April 22, free. Spotlighting the rich heritage and traditional customs of California’s Japanese-Americans. Costumed performers, taiko drums, martial arts, and koto music bring the East out West.

Bay One Acts Festival, Boxcar Theatre, 505 Natoma, SF. www.bayoneacts.org. April 22 — May 12, 2012, $25–$45 at the door or online. Showcasing the best of SF indie theater, with new works by Bay Area playwrights.

Earth Day, Civic Center Plaza, SF. (415) 571-9895, www.earthdaysf.org. April 22, free. A landmark day for the “Greenest City in North America,” featuring an eco-village, organic chef demos, a holistic health zone, and live music.

Wedding and Celebration Show, Parc 55 Wyndham, 55 Cyril Magnin, SF. (925) 594-2969,www.bayareaweddingfairs.com. April 28, 10:00am-5:00pm. Exhibitors in a “Boutique Mall” display every style of product and service a bride may need to help plan his or her wedding.

San Francisco International Beer Festival, Fort Mason Center, Festival Pavilion, SF.www.sfbeerfest.com. April 28, 7pm-10pm, $65. The price of admission gets you a bottomless taster mug for hundreds of craft beers, which you can pair with a side of food from local restaurants.

Pacific Coast Dream Machines Show, Half Moon Bay Airport, 9850 Cabrillo Highway North, Half Moon Bay. www.miramarevents.com/dreammachines. April 28-29, 9am-4pm, $20 for adults, kids under 10 free. The annual celebration of mechanical ingenuity, an outdoor museum featuring 2,000 driving, flying and working machines from the past 200 years.

May:

San Francisco International Arts Festival Various venues. (415) 399-9554, www.sfiaf.org. May 2-20, prices vary. Celebrate the arts, both local and international, at this multimedia extravaganza.

Cinco de Mayo Festival, Dolores Park, Dolores and 19th St, SF. www.sfcincodemayo.com. May 5, 10am-6pm, free. Enjoy live performances by San Francisco Bay Area artists, including mariachis, dancers, salsa ensembles, food and crafts booths. Big party.

A La Carte and Art, Castro St. between Church and Evelyn, Mountain View. May 5-6, 10am-6pm, free. With vendors selling handmade crafts, micro-brewed beers, fresh foods, a farmers market, and even a fun zone for kids, there’s little you won’t find at this all-in-one fun fair.

Young at Art Festival, De Young Museum, 50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive, SF. (415) 695-2441.www.youngatartsf.com. May 12-20, regular museum hours, $11. An eight-day celebration of student creativity in visual, literary, media, and performing arts.

 

This article is courtesy of and continues at Spring fairs and festivals | SF Bay Guardian.

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Mission Bowling Club, Raven, Yuubi, More, Now Open – Monday Opening Report – Eater SF

MissionBowlingMission Bowling Club, Raven, Yuubi, More, Now Open

 

1) The Mission: Mission Bowling Club opens tonight at 6 p.m. and as you can see in this picture here, all six bowling lanes are ready to roll. We shared the menu earlier, and Anthony Myint wants you to know it’s not all Mission Burgers. His French onion casserole has been disappearing with warp speed. (Sidenote: If you must have the price tag on said Mission Burger explained, here you go.) 3176 17th St. [EaterWire, Mission Mission]

2) SoMa: Raven is a new Michael Brennan-designed bar on Folsom St. that’s meant to look like a modern take on a film noir hangout with antique mirrors, padded walls and exposed light bulbs on the bar top. Take a look at the drink list here, and expect this place to become a bit of a dance-y pick-up place as the night wears on. If you visit earlier, happy hour includes bar food from nearby Triptych and Rocco’s. 1151 Folsom St. 415-431-1151. [EaterWire]

3) The Richmond: According to Grubz, Yuubi is a new Japanese restaurant and sushi bar now open on Balboa. 501 Balboa Street. 415-508-9767. Facebook adds the tagline: “Where fresh fish meets good price,” and The Richmond Blog reminds something is needed to fill the void since Namu left. [GrubStreet, TRB]

4) Yerba Buena: A few days ago, Pascal Rigo‘s 12th San Francisco La Boulange was added to the newly revamped Metreon. Also notice the website says they’ve added some cult-favorite kouign-amann to the “seasonal treats” in the pastry case. 781 Mission St. [EaterWire, Inside Scoop]

5) Bernal: The Front Porch team’s Rock Bar has been open for a few weeks now, and they’re ready to do a grand opening party on Wednesday. Check out the invite here, which details mad drink specials, plus donkey punch, donkey games and donkey rides. 80 29th St [EaterWire]

6) Napa: Reception has been overwhelmingly good at the new Southern comfort food spot Napa Valley Biscuits, which has been opening and closing sporadically over the past few days. Tablehopper says they’ve got a “fabulous chicken biscuit sandwich,” and hours should stabilize as soon as they ramp up to meet all the unexpected demand. 1502 Main St., 707-265-8209 [Tablehopper]
[Photo: Aubrie Pick]

via Mission Bowling Club, Raven, Yuubi, More, Now Open – Monday Opening Report – Eater SF.

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