Category Archives: Food and Drink

Nirvana in a Box

Nirvana in a Box.

– See more at: http://www.modernluxury.com/san-francisco/story/nirvana-box#sthash.kVcjmDgG.dpuf

“One pan. 10 minutes. Countless OOHHs and AHHs,” read the message on one side of the cardboard box. “#DinnerSolved,” proclaimed its other side. The solution it contained was a platoon of individually packaged, par-cooked ingredients for sweet potato and black bean enchiladas. Resting on a bed of ice packs and swaddled by insulated foam panels, it was the meal I’d ordered from Gobble, one of the Bay Area’s burgeoning number of subscription dinner-kit services.

Before trying Gobble, I’d spoken with its founder, Ooshma Garg, who had explained her company’s MO: “We cook just enough so you feel there’s just enough cooking for you to do. You can end up with an exquisite, perfectly made meal that we’ve assured for you.” In other words, it’s the culinary equivalent of assembling an IKEA nightstand. Cooking Gobble’s enchiladas amounted to opening the plastic bags and containers holding the individual components—premade filling, Spanish rice, salsa roja, a few corn tortillas, cotija cheese, and fresh cilantro—spooning the filling into the tortillas, and sticking it all in the oven for a few minutes.

“Exquisite” isn’t the word I’d use to describe the result, which was tasty and inoffensive in the manner of above-average cafeteria food. But that was fitting, I suppose, since I didn’t feel like I’d actually done any cooking. And that, in effect, is the idea at the core of the growing dinner-kit industry, which got its start, tellingly, in Sweden with the 2007 debut of a service called Middagsfrid (which roughly translates to “the calm that you feel when you sit down and have dinner after a long day”). It began gaining traction in this country a few years ago with the launch of companies like Blue Apron and Plated, both of which posed a virtually identical value proposition: Give us your credit card information and we’ll do the grunt work.

What “cooks” get, in effect, is dinner concocted with just enough some-assembly-required exertion to yield a wee frisson of DIY satisfaction. As someone who enjoys cooking, I am inherently skeptical of these companies. But even my somewhat freakish love of grocery store aisles doesn’t fully account for my knee-jerk dubiousness. It’s also a reaction to what George Packer memorably described in the New Yorker as the mission of Silicon Valley’s hottest tech startups: “Solving all the problems of being twenty years old, with cash on hand.”

The dinner-kit companies may be peddling to time-strapped working people up and down the class ladder, but their real customer base is a cohort with a surfeit of disposable income and an undying need to streamline the crap out of modern life. So it’s no surprise, then, that Silicon Valley investors are funding subscription-dinner kit startups as fast as they can demo their product, each promising a personalized spin on the concept. There’s Gobble, which was founded in 2010 as a sort of dinner matchmaking service for chefs and customers and now delivers precooked components for what Garg calls “Michelin-level meal[s] that you could never have made yourself through your own skills.”

There’s seven-month-old Sun Basket, which employs former Slanted Door chef Justine Kelly and an in-house nutritionist to create lifestyle-specific meals (paleo, gluten-free) that emphasize organic ingredients from local farms and, in founder Adam Zbar’s words, “export California value and bounty” to users. Three-year-old PlateJoy, which has $1.7 million in funding from investors as diverse as SherpaVentures, Foundation Capital, and Jared Leto (!), is likewise focused on healthy cooking. Its founder, Christina Bognet, clarifies, “We are a technology-enabled personalized-ingredient startup that uses algorithms to make you healthy,” which translates to bags of organic ingredients delivered directly from Whole Foods, along with recipes.

Meanwhile, 10-month-old Din uses precooked dinner components, like Gobble, but differentiates itself with mostly organic and locally sourced ingredients and recipes from restaurants like Bar Tartine and Tacolicious. By doing the prep work, explains Din cofounder Emily Olson LaFave, “We’re empowering people who are scared of it not working out.” Fair enough. But there’s something a little contradictory about these elevator pitches, which ostensibly extol the virtues of a home-cooked meal while presenting cooking as a source of stress and unhappiness akin to purchasing a used car. Bognet describes planning and cooking healthy meals as “just too complicated,” while Olson LaFave recalls analyzing cooking’s “pain points” as part of her research.

Granted, cooking may be this anguishing for some people. And it’s plausible that these services have the potential to help more such kitchen apostates across the country cook dinner. Still, cutting through the varying layers of startup bombast (at one point, Garg described Gobble as “lifesaving”), I was left with the question I have about most of the apps and web-based services supposedly created to simplify our lives: How exhaustively do we need to be spoon-fed (in this case, almost literally)?

And while we’re at it, here’s a riddle: How many ziplock bags does it take to negate a company’s claim that it cares deeply about organic/local/sustainable/environmentally conscious food? At this point, complaining that tech startups are turning us into teething infants incapable of handling surprise or discomfort is about as useful as complaining about the amount of sand on a beach. Although none of the companies I spoke with would disclose their subscriber numbers, the growth of their sector speaks to the fact that a significant number of people will pay for the privilege of having someone else do their planning and precooking for them.

I do like that some of these startups appear to be serious about reducing the amount of trash that typically accompanies dinner kits: PlateJoy delivers its ingredients in a grocery bag and uses a waste-reduction algorithm to cut down on unused food; Din packages its goods in a reusable (and returnable) tote lined with disappearing dry ice; and Sun Basket employs recycled blue jeans as insulation for its boxes, which customers can likewise return. A more compelling question for me, though, is where this is going, or could go. Food, after all, is basically analog, a massive market that hasn’t yet been impacted by tech.

Garg, who believes that we’re moving inexorably toward “a delivery culture around commodities,” goes so far as to predict that “all commodity goods outlets, including takeout restaurants, Walmarts, Targets, Blockbusters, and grocery stores, will cease to exist. The only infrastructure worth existing for the consumer will be built around a unique consumer cultural experience like a movie theater or theme park or Michelin-starred restaurant.” Setting aside the fact that Blockbuster’s demise is a fait accompli, maybe that’s what bugs me: Implicit in Garg’s forecast is the belief that something like buying groceries and planning a meal isn’t a worthy experience, and that a restaurant needs a Michelin star in order to be deserving of existence.

Growing up, I got arguably more quality time with my parents from grocery shopping than from going to the movies or watching TV together; it might not have been the most entertaining endeavor, but it was ours, and it had value. I’m sure plenty of families would readily outsource their meal planning (provided they could afford to), but I’m also sure that delivery culture has about as much chance of making us happier as partially built Nornäs drawers from IKEA do. And that’s not even taking into account the convenience economy’s dark underbelly, with its army of low-paid workers who labor to make life easier for the relatively affluent.

Ultimately, I’d be less skeptical of the dinner-kit industry if #DinnerSolved meant putting healthy, easily prepared food in the hands of the less fortunate. I realize that’s not going to make anyone a billionaire, and that it’s unfair to judge these companies for what they aren’t. A lot of their food is actually pretty good. But those entrées would be easier to swallow if they didn’t often come with a side order of baloney.


Email Rebecca Flint Marx at 
rmarx@modernluxury.com
Follow us on Twitter 
@sanfranmag
Follow Rebecca Flint Marx at 
@EdibleComplex

– See more at: http://www.modernluxury.com/san-francisco/story/nirvana-box#sthash.kVcjmDgG.dpuf

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How Much Would It Cost You to Make Toscas $42 Roasted Half of a Chicken?

How Much Would It Cost You to Make Toscas $42 Roasted Half of a Chicken?.

 

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This Sunday, come Explore San Francisco and create some wonderful Mother’s Day memories to last a long time.

Take Mom out for a food tour and a cruise on the Bay for only $64!
Choose any of these food tours:

  • North Beach at Night
  • Mission Vegetarian
  • Little Saigon
  • Mission District South (24th Street)
  • The Real Chinatown

Paired with a Bay Cruise on San Francisco Bay!


To make reservations or for more information, please call:415.504.3636 x 102 or email: reservations@exploresf.bizLimited number of spots available
Golden Gate Bay CruiseOperated by:

Red and White Fleet

Give her the fun day she deserves
While making memories to last a lifetime

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Prague flower shop

Prague flower shop (Photo credit: jafsegal)

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The Scandinavian Restaurant You Never Knew You Needed Has Finally Opened-Plaj

PLAJ RESTAURANT AND BAR

333 Fulton Street, between Franklin and Gough Streets
San Francisco, CA
Telephone 415. 863. 8400
Reservations: http://bit.ly/Plaj_Reservations
Website: http://plajrestaurant.com/ 
 

Plaj. Photo: Thrillist
Sundell

Introducing Pläj, San Francisco’s latest restaurant — and perhaps more interestingly, its first Scandinavian restaurant.

Chef-owner Roberth Sundell opened Pläj (pronounced similar to “play”) on Friday night at the Inn at the Opera. He says he’s quite pleased with how the opening weekend went.

“We are focusing on Scandinavian cuisine, but also we don’t do super traditional,” says the Stockholm-born Sundell.

“We are adding a lot of California flair to our food so it speaks to a broader experience. If we went too traditional, the only people will be the Scandinavian and they will probably only show up once a month,” he laughs.

Sundell came to America 18 years, and soon met his San Francisco wife. He’s cooked in Los Angeles, and more recently, at a private club in Tahoe. But when a friend approached him about the possibility of opening a Scandinavian place in the former Ovations space, he jumped at the opportunity.

“In eight weeks we painted the place, cleaned it up, added new furniture and new menu. And now we’re open.”

He describes the menu (in full below) as neither small plates nor large plates, but Goldilocks-appropriate medium sizes, with four-ounce servings of proteins. There’s the obligatory herring, meatballs and kumla, plus a Scandinavian twist on a charcuterie plate with salted lamb, cured pork belly and wild boar salami; here’s hoping for some reindeer eventually. Berries — lingonberry, cloudberries, gooseberries — are all over the menu, too.

There are 44 seats in the restaurant, with another six at the bar. Speaking of the bar, the entire beer list (also below) consists entirely of Scandinavian beers, as noted byEater a few weeks ago. The cocktail list has plenty of Northern European flair as well, with cameos from Bols Genever, elderflower syrup, rosehip syrup and of course, vodka (also, references to The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo).

Open for dinner nightly, from 5pm to 11pm. Here are the food and drink menus:

Plaj:
333 Fulton Street, between Franklin and Gough.
(415) 863-8400

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Architecture Spotlight: Jackson Brewery | Untapped SF

Jackson Brewery

By Cindy Casey

There have been over 79 breweries in San Francisco’s history, most of them either lost to the 1906 earthquake or in the two years following the 1919 passage of the 21st amendment. These lost brew houses included the North Star Brewery at Filbert and Sansome, the Globe Brewing Company at Sansome and Greenwich and the Jackson Brewing Company. Yet despite the fact that the Jackson Brewing Company did not survive Prohibition, its building still stands.

1906 Damaged Jackson Brewing Company (Photo credit: San Francisco Public Library)

The Jackson Brewing Company was owned by the William A. Fredericks family from 1867 to 1920. The first brewery was on First Street between Howard and Folsom; they purchased the property at Folsom and 11th in 1905. Early construction was destroyed by the earthquake and subsequent fire. Consequently, the new brewery wasn’t completed until 1912.

The brewery is composed of a series of low-rise brick buildings sitting on a concrete foundation and simply ornamented with concrete and wood. This Romanesque Revival style brewery is one of the last remaining turn-of-the-century brewing complexes of its type.

Romanesque architecture was a style that emerged in Western Europe in the early 11th century. It has Roman and Byzantine elements and is characterized by massive articulated wall structures, round arches, and powerful vaults. This style lasted until the advent of Gothic architecture in the middle of the 12th century. Romanesque Revival was the reuse in the second half of the 19th century of the massive Romanesque forms.

Romanesque architecture in the United States was much simpler than that found in Europe. The Romanesque features of the Jackson Brewery include semicircular arches for the door and window openings and a belt course (a horizontal band across a building).

Due to its brick construction, the Jackson Brewery building did not fare well in the 1989 Loma Prieta Earthquake. A thorough retrofitting was done to upgrade the building to San Francisco’s 1990 building codes. The building is now a mixed-use complex with seven live-work condominiums and a restaurant.

San Francisco is now home to only ten breweries. These include the famous Anchor Steam Brewery and lesser-known local favorites such as The Beach Chalet, Speakeasy and the ThirstyBear.

The Jackson Brewery was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1993 and is San Francisco Landmark #199.

Jackson Brewery
1489 Folsom Street, San Francisco [Map]

Follow Untapped Cities on Twitter and Facebook. Get in touch with the author @PQPP3.


The Weeknighter: Churchill

The Weeknighter: Churchill

 

Churchill, Church Street at Market

The Weeknighter: Churchill

Photo from Churchill’s website

Weekends are for amateurs. Weeknights are for pros. That’s why each week Stuart Schuffman will be exploring a different San Francisco bar, giving you the lowdown on how and where to do your weeknight right.  From the most creative cocktails to the best happy hours, Stuart’s taking you along on his weeknight adventures into the heart of the City’s nightlife. So, who wants a drink?

I was thinking of the line in “Steady Rollin’ ”, the Two Gallants song, that goes “You might’ve seen me ‘neath the pool hall lights/Well baby I go back each night.” It was a Monday night atChurchill and it was Andy’s turn to shoot. He was on my team while we played pool against Geri-Ayn, Tiffany, and Maggie; it was boys against girls. I was fucking with Instagram, trying to get a good picture that felt the way the night did, but got this one instead. Later on in the week and especially during weekends, Churchill is packed with people drinking and talking and trying to figure out if they’re going home alone or with someone else. The crowd is full of of gays, straights, and in-betweens, a reflection of one of The City’s best crossroads, where the Lower Haight, The Mission, and the Castro all collide and collude to make a place called Church and Market.

But like I said, it was Monday, and while there were other people in the bar, we had the pool table (and more importantly the jukebox) all to ourselves. Andy popped on Bob Seger’s “Night Moves” while Maggie lined up a shot, and I looked out the window and watched The City’s weird, sad parade of homelessness trudge by. “I need a drink. Who else wants one?” I asked and only Tiffany joined in, so we walked to the bar and she bought me a drink because I opened my wallet and realized I’d run out of money. The other people at the bar were imbibing pretty things with names like Bees Ness, El Diablo, and The Homefront. The cocktails at Churchill are seasonal so the drink list changes fairly often. But I got what I always get, a vodka soda with a lemon. I gotta watch my girlish figure after all.

A couple incarnations ago the joint was called The Transfer. It was a skeezy gay bar with cheap drinks and had dance parties where everyone was young, wasted, and androgynous. It was a lot of fun and a lot of weird. Churchill has come a long way since then. The crowd is decidedly more upmarket and the interior is quite lovely, something that never could’ve been said about The Transfer. Dotting the big open space are fixtures reminiscent of another time. The theme here is WWII era watering hole so there’s a massive American flag with only 48 stars (sorry Alaska and Hawaii), ropes and repurposed wood for a ceiling, vintage lamps, and a portrait of the bar’s namesake, Winston Churchill.

After the pool game and a couple more drinks it was time to go. It was at least 1 am and people had to get up for work the next day and I needed to work on this article. So we all went our separate ways. While walking home I got to thinking about how wonderful my life is. The fact that it’s totally a normal thing to spend Monday night in an awesome bar with brilliant friends is a testament to San Francisco. People my age in the rest of the country had already been in bed for hours dreaming about how much they hate their bosses. I got to be out late and be paid to write about it. It reminded me of another line from the same Two Gallants song, “Out waltzing with the holy ghost/from the Bowery to the Barbary Coast/the land I’m from you know I love the most/steady rollin’ and I keep going.”

Stuart Schuffman has been called “an Underground legend” by the SF Chronicle, “an SF cult hero” by the SF Bay Guardian, and “the chief of cheap” by Time Out New York. He is also the host for the IFC travel show Young, Broke & Beautiful. Follow him @BrokeAssStuart.

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"Explore Pride Tours 2012"

 

Pride 2012

Gay owned and operated,Explore San Francisco is pleased to announce Pride Tours 2012. Want to see the city above and beyond the parade, festival and the clubs? We offer the GLBT community tours and sightseeing within our community but outside of the box. Food tours, walking tours, running tours, 1970s Folsom District walk, or even porn studio tours. We accomodate groups and we offer sightseeing with transport provided by van service, SUV or town car. You may find the perfect choice from our regular itinerary or let us create something special for you. Please call the Pride Desk at 415.793.1104 or email pride@exploresf.biz

Scenic Running

Scenic RunningSan Francisco is the perfect city for running, incomparable scenery, varied terrain and mild temperatures. Take one of our scheduled runs or let us lead you on a custom run.

 

North Beach & Chinatown

North Beach & Chinatown at NightThis tour is very social, we have fun and friendships are made. Maybe its the wine or exotic teas, good food, the company or the vibrant area, but if youre looking for a great evening, you cant go wrong with this fun event.This is part of our regular line up, 4 or more and well have a GLBT outing.

 

Neighborhood Tours

Side StreetsSan Francisco, California is one of the most walkable cities in the country. We have walking tours all over the city. Choose from our regular line up of tours, or let us design something for you. 415.793.1104

 

Folsom- Armory

Folsom DistrictRelive the 1970s Miracle Mile and The Folsom District in all of its glory. See just the Folsom or combine this with a tour of the SF Armory, home of Kink.com. Select tours go to Treasure Island MediaUpon Request

 

Upon Request

Anniversary or birthday celebration, Pride Party to never forget, personal milestone, marriage proposal, business proposal, romantic evening or just something new and different. Give us your vision and let us expertly and meticulously make your extraordinary event a lifetime memory. 415.793.1104

Shuttle, Van, Towncar

Shuttle, Van or Town CarANapa, The Russian River, Black Sand Beach, or San Gregorio are all popular GLBT destinations within driving distance. We have transportation for any size group. Please call the Pride Desk for these spots or anywhere else you might like to see! 415.793.110

via “Explore Pride Tours 2012”.

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The Early Word on Gioia Pizzeria in Russian Hill – Good News/Bad News – Eater SF

The Early Word on Gioia Pizzeria in Russian Hill

Tuesday, June 12, 2012, by Eater Intern

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76Gioia Bar.jpg[Photo: Aubrie Pick]

the_early_word_on_gioia_pizzeria_in_russian_hill.php.pngWith an established fan base in Berkeley, Gioia Pizzeria made it’s jump from a pizza-by-the-slice East Bay joint to a full fledged restaurant in San Francisco in mid-April. Started by Brooklynite Will Gioia and his wife Karen Gioia, the brand’s pizzas have been hailed a go-to for New York expats looking for an East-Coast-ish slice and what Karen calls “a California mentality.” Illustrating the kitchen’s pedigree from places like Chez Panisse, Zuni Cafe, and Bar Jules, the Polk Street menu also has things like radiatore pasta with guinea hen ragu, and soft shell crabs when they’re in season. How has the leap to SF fared in the public eye? To the Early Word, for a read on the situation.

The Pizza News: Tasting Table, on the pizzas: “chewy but pliant enough to fold, and toppings are applied with a light hand.” SF Station’s Brad Japhe explains that the “East Coast-style thin crust pizza… comes crisp with billowing cornicion from a large Montague oven.” He recommends the Salsiccia pie: “[an] optimal blend of spicy and savory and I wish had another slice or 4 in front of me as I type this.” David Kover at Serious Eats digs the Julian, “a pie named for the Gioias’ four-year-old son, with toppings that change to match his temperament…the combinations on this pie usually have some heat. These days, it’s sweet and spicy prosciutto cotto, along with some chili, red onion, garlic, and provolone.” And Urban Daddy writes “We’d steer you toward the funghi pie”

The Decor News: “The design elements are as artisanal as anything you’ll find in the walk-in [fridge].” writes Meesha Halm at Zagat, and Tablehopper calls the decor “industrial-yet-rustic” and “appealing.”

The Compared-To-Berkeley News: “If you’re familiar with the original Berkeley locale, expect the opposite,” writes Urban Daddy and Halm at Zagat reviews, “this new buffed-out Russian Hill outpost bears little resemblance in (food, looks or seating) to the original.” FoodNut writes, “The San Francisco location is much nicer, with lots of tables, but you still need to go up to the counter to order your food.” and is overall “much more appealing than a pizza slice store.” SF Station reviews that it is “quite an evolution beyond the cozy pizza parlor vibe of the East Bay original. “

The Crowd News: “Dinner brought one-hour waits as Russian Hill swells and pie-freaks lined up to see what all the fuss was about,” Zagat writes. SF Station ensures that the “several notable additions make it well worth the wait.” On Four Square, john r. offers this advice: “Avoid dinner crowds. Eat there for lunch.”

The Lunch News:Food Nut describes how the “Chicken Parmesan Sandwich with Mozzarella, Chicken Cutlet, Parmesan, Marinara ($11) came on an Acme bun and proved to be a pretty large sandwich, fresh out of the fryer. Good stuff.”

The Entrée News: “Don’t let the pizza define the experience.” writes Tasting Table adding, “It would be a shame to miss the fried squid, broccoli and spring onions ($12), sided by a big dollop of aioli” as well as the “Five Dot Ranch skirt steak glistening with bagna càuda ($26)”

The Antipasti News: “the sous chef [Ryan Cantwell] has a thing for pickles” Zagat writes and they “can be ordered as a separate antipasti plate and occasionally turn up as a topping on the pizza.” SF Station reviews: “The housemade charcuterie as well as the Bellwether Farms cheese-stuffed shells appear to be standouts.” And simply put by Raffi K. on Four Square: “Best meatballs I’ve ever had.”

· All Gioia Pizzeria Coverage [~ ESF ~]

via The Early Word on Gioia Pizzeria in Russian Hill – Good News/Bad News – Eater SF.

Pig & Pie Set to Open By the End of the Month — Grub Street San Francisco

Part of the wave of Mission openings this spring/summer is one we haven’t forgotten: Pig & Pie (2962 24th Street), a new sausage spot in the former Discolandia space. Owner Miles Pickering contacted Grub Street to let us know that they appear on track for a soft opening on Sunday, June 24, pending their final health inspection and such. The preliminary menu of sausages, sides, and pies is still here, and once they open you can expect to find them open seven days a week, starting at 11 a.m., for lunch, dinner, and bar-crawl snacks until 1 a.m. on weekends (11 p.m. weeknights). We’ll update you to let you know if they hit their target date. [Earlier]

via Pig & Pie Set to Open By the End of the Month — Grub Street San Francisco.

20120612_pigandpie_250x190.jpg

Has Food Killed San Francisco's Edgy Music Scene?: SFist

Has Food Killed San Francisco’s Edgy Music Scene?

raisins.jpgBack in the days of yore, San Francisco concertgoers used to sneak off to the bathroom to do bumps of cocaine or heroin in between sets. That’s the way God wanted it. Now local aural revelers prefer to luxuriate in such edibles as artisan pizza or bacon endive wrapped pancreas butt while listening to emasculated crooners with no visible ass. The marriage of music and food is about as edgy and creative as the Vh1 Fashion & Music Awards, or so hints Ian S. Port who penned this thought-provoking piece on food and music in SF Weekly. He claims that young “full-time freaks and out-of-the-way spaces that host them” are disappearing due to terrible tech ilk and the fine food they cram down their gullets. More or less.

He explains:

Here’s how it goes: Creative people — not web designers or software developers, but artists, musicians, activists, writers, and other colorful types — tend not to make much money. As this city becomes less and less affordable, those people leave. And when those people leave, whom will the city’s entertainment events target? The people who can afford to stay: Young, well-off tech workers or high-income young couples, whose tastes and lifestyles are cushier, more conservative, less driven by purely creative aims, and, often — if only in comparison with the people they’ve replaced — dull.

These bougies-in-training will want events to practice their conspicuous consumption, whether on food, booze, music, or all at the same time. And they’ll get it at events like Noisette. This kind of high-minded consumerism — fun as it is — will become the norm, even more than it already has. So while it was once a respite for low-income creatives and real deviants, who would pay $5 or $10 to go a show or a party (at the Eagle Tavern, or Annie’s Social Club, or Kimo’s, remember those?), swill cheap whiskey, and watch something freaky and loud until early in the morning, San Francisco will slowly become one big pork-belly party, an amusement park for well-off residents to discover some new consumer good to become picky over, or for bridge-and-tunnel types to visit on the weekend, go to an overpriced club, and meet a hookup. Big concerts will draw kids from the ‘burbs paying $50 or more a head. They’ll never believe they could be rich enough to actually live here.

Or, maybe most twentysomethings really are into food that much? This New York Times article seems to suggest as much. And from what few twenty-year-old types we selectively keep in our social harem of unbridled lunatics, they sure do go on and on and on about pop-ups and gastronomic thingamajigs. (Hand to God, if just one of them brings up another pop-up restaurant into conversation, we shall steal their youthful essence Charlize Theron-style.) After all, punk is dead and more of a distant Gen Xer memory, yes? Then again, the music scene here in SF is admittedly quiet, so… who knows? Maybe your pork slider is the cause of it all. And if it is, maybe that’s not such a bad thing.

Anyway, Port goes on to point out a harrowing future, one involving…Oakland. He writes:

The freaks and creatives won’t go too far — they’ll go to Oakland, where there’s much more space, at much lower cost. The kinds of reckless energy that powered San Francisco music from the ’60s through the ’90s will trickle away, as much of it has already. And the city will be worse for it.

Read the piece in its entirety. It’s a good read.

Update: Grub Street editor (and SFist contributor) Jay Barmann weighs in as well. He says that, hey, this is what people want, adding, “the times are a-changin’, and on the bright side, at least the food is way better here than it was ten years ago.”

Contact the author of this article or email tips@sfist.com with further questions, comments or tips.

via Has Food Killed San Francisco’s Edgy Music Scene?: SFist.