Category Archives: SOMA- Folsom District

Recognizing, Protecting and Memorializing South of Market LGBTQ Social Heritage Neighborhood Resources

July 18, 2011


Recognizing, Protecting and Memorializing South of Market LGBTQ Social Heritage Neighborhood Resources
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FINDINGS and PURPOSE ………………………………………………………………………………… 1 JUSTIFICATION………………………………………………………………………………………………. 3 FEATURES and INDIVIDUAL ASSETS………………………………………………………………. 9 BOUNDARIES and PROPOSED TREATMENTS……………………………………………….. 13 STANDARDS and GUIDELINES for REVIEW of NEW CONSTRUCTION …………….. 15 Appendix 1-Types of Designation ………………………………………………………………….. 19 Appendix 2- LGBTQ Heritage SUD Mitigation Measures………………………………….. 20 Appendix 3—LGBTQ Social Heritage Special Use District Survey …………………… 24

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FINDINGS and PURPOSE

After many small meetings with members of the Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender Queer (LGBTQ) community, the Western SoMa Task Citizens Planning Task Force is proposing to celebrate the LGBTQ neighborhood legacy. Using creative means to educate, acknowledge diversity and the value of LGBTQ neighborhood resources, the community proposes to memorialize and recognize the living LGBTQ social heritage and fabric of this San Francisco neighborhood.

The places of everyday urban life are, by their nature, mundane, ordinary, and constantly reused, and their social and political meanings are often not obvious. It takes a great deal of research, community involvement and inventive signing and mapping to bring these meanings out, but this process can lead from urban landscape history into community– based urban preservation, as understanding the past encourages residents to frame their ideas about the present and future” (The Power of Place”, Dolores Hayden)1

For the LGBTQ community within SoMa, social heritage is valuable and an important part of local, regional and world history. Therefore, LGBTQ assets have been identified and mapped according to grassroots methodologies for identification and analysis. The community has also provided recommendations for celebrating these past and present neighborhood resources.

1 Dolores Hayden, The Power of Place, Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press, 1995.

 

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Using the Urban Landscape to Celebrate Social Heritage The DRAFT Western SoMa Community Plan, (August 14, 2008) includes policies

encouraging the preservation of social heritage.

Policy 6.1.1: Survey, identify and evaluate historic and cultural resources in a manner that is consistent with the context statement prepared for

the Western SoMa area.

Policy 6.2.9: Support the retention of “social heritage” values, properties and historic preservation districts within Western SoMa.

The LGBTQ community in SoMa is proposing the following: 1. To establish boundaries for a LGBTQ Social Heritage Special Use District (SUD) that

demarcates core social heritage assets. 2. To identify and classify individual assets. 3. To sustain on-going research and policies that encourages the preservation of local

social heritage and local culture through the Western SoMa Plan and other means. 4. To use the urban landscape to celebrate public history, using public features as a way

to educate and accept diversity, leaving an important legacy at the heart of the neighborhood. a) Honor a handful of LGBTQ sites which have embodied the essence of the

neighborhood legacy with individual commemorative inscription and symbols. b) Create a social-heritage path or tourist trail which celebrates collective important

and valuable events and traditions such as festivals and street fairs still growing

into local, regional and even world-wide history. c) Seek funding to produce a booklet on important LGBTQ sites South of Market.

Published by Labor Archives, The San Francisco Labor Landmarks Guide Book: A Register of Sites and Walking Tours (edited by Susan Sherwood and Catherine Powell) could serve as a model.

d) Propose renaming streets and alleyways after some of the major figures of local leather history.

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JUSTIFICATION

South of Market has long been one of the major neighborhoods for San Francisco’s

LGBTQ populations. Before the 1960s, much of this LGBTQ activity was concentrated

along the old waterfront. Historian, Allan Berube, has noted the extent to which local

gay life overlapped and intermixed with the San Francisco world of sailors, merchant

seamen, longshoremen, and others who worked the wharves and shipyards and lived

nearby. The Embarcadero was known as a gay male cruising area at least as far back as

the 1920s. Berube writes, “Along the waterfronts in port cities were complex sexual

cultures that incorporated… erotic arrangements between men…. On the Embarcadero

in San Francisco, for example, before the 1960s, were hundreds of cheap hotels, taverns,

lunch rooms, cafeterias, union halls, and the YMCA where maritime and waterfront

workers and servicemen hung out and interacted with others outside their worlds.”

Berube explains that by the 1950s, ‚what might have been described as the early gay

bars and nightlife in San Francisco might more appropriately be called the homosexual

aspects of waterfront culture. These often attracted gay men from other parts of the city.” 2

Police crackdowns along the Embarcadero in the mid-1950s and early 1960s pushed gay bars and their patrons west. The Polk Street and Folsom Street neighborhoods became densely and visibly gay during the 1960s. Before the emergence of the Castro in the 1970s, Polk Street was the major gay residential and commercial center, while Folsom and South of Market drew the ‚leather‛ crowd.

The Tool Box, a bar that opened at 399 Fourth Street at Harrison in 1962, was the first gay leather bar South of Market. The leather scene moved to what would become its ‚main street‛ in 1966, when Febe’s and the Stud opened on Folsom Street between 11th and 12th Streets. The Ramrod followed in 1968, and soon several other bars soon opened

2 Berube, Allan. 1993. “‘Dignity for All’: The Role of Homosexuality in the Marine Cooks and Stewards Union (1930s-1950s).” Paper presented at the conference Reworking American Labor History: Race, Gender, and Class. Madison.

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along a three-block strip of Folsom Street, establishing a core area economy which continued to expand in the 1970s that anchored a burgeoning ‚leather‛ district.3

By the end of the 1960s, San Francisco leather bars had become heavily concentrated along Folsom Street, and leather bars and businesses sprouted in the surrounding blocks. By the late 1970s, South of Market had become one of the most extensive gay leather neighborhoods in the world. As a result, gay South of Market acquired a number of nicknames, including the ‚Folsom‛, the ‚Miracle Mile‛, and the ‚Valley of the Kings.‛ While the Castro was unquestionably the center of local gay politics, the Folsom had become the sexual center. The same features that made the area attractive to leather bars made it hospitable to other forms of gay sexual commerce. Most of the local gay bathhouses and sex clubs also nestled among the warehouses South of Market. 4

The gay and leather occupation South of Market reached its zenith by 1982 then shrank dramatically in the mid 1980s before stabilizing by the early 1990s.5 Today, the gay and leather presence is still significant, most visibly in the small concentration of gay leather bars, shops, and sex clubs bounded by Folsom, Harrison, Fifth and Twelfth Streets, and in the annual Folsom Street Fair and the Up Your Alley fair.

Folsom Street

As Dolores Hayden has observed, ‚Festivals and parades also help to define cultural identity in spatial terms by staking out routes in the urban cultural landscape. Although their presence is temporary they can be highly effective in claiming the symbolic importance of places. They inter-mix vernacular arts traditions (in their costumes, floats, music, dance, and performances) with spatial history.‛6

3 Rubin, Gayle, 2000: “Sites, Settlements, and Urban Sex: Archaeology And The Study of Gay Leathermen in San Francisco 1955-1995,” in Robert Schmidt and Barbara Voss, eds., Archaeologies of Sexuality, London, Routledge. 62-88. 4 Rubin, Gayle, 1998 “The Miracle Mile: South of Market and Gay Male Leather in San Francisco 1962–1996,” in James Brook, Chris Carlsson, and Nancy Peters, eds., Reclaiming San Francisco: History, Politics, Culture, San Francisco, City Lights Books. 247-272.

5 Rubin, Gayle. 1997. “Elegy for the Valley of the Kings: AIDS and the Leather Community in San Francisco, 1981-1996,” in Martin P. Levine, Peter M. Nardi, and John H. Gagnon, eds., In Changing Times: Gay Men and Lesbians Encounter HIV/AIDS, Chicago, University of Chicago Press. 101-143 6 Hayden, The Power of Place, 38.

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As LGBTQ presence South of Market began to shrink in the 1980s, two street fairs that would continue to define the neighborhood were founded. These Fairs have become important in claiming the gay and leather past South of Market, and in maintaining a gay and leather presence in the neighborhood.

The Folsom Street Fair began in 1984. It has become California’s third largest spectator event. It is the world’s largest leather event and showcase for BDSM products and culture.7 It has grown as a non-profit charity, and local and national non-profits benefit with all donations at the gates going to charity groups as well as numerous fundraising schemes within the festival including games, beverage booths and even spankings for donations to capitalize on the adult-themed exhibitionism.

According to the organizers, over its 17 year history, a conservative calculation is that the Folsom Street Fair has returned over four million dollars in earned revenue to local and national charities.

The Up Your Alley Fair was started in 1985. Originally held on Ringold Alley, it later moved to Dore Alley. Up Your Alley is a smaller and more local event, but it too is an important annual festival. The Up Your Alley and Folsom Street fairs are now run by the same organization, and both raise funds for many community charities and organizations.

Special Challenges of Moral Regions – Identification and Preservation

Throughout the 20th century, large industrial cities such as San Francisco were major locations where gay, lesbian, and transgender communities were able to form and occupy territory. This process of sexual concentration and territorialization was recognized by the early urban sociologists, such as Robert E. Park, who famously coined the terminology of ‚moral regions.‛ In a city, said Park, ‚the population tends to segregate itself, not merely in accordance with its interests, but in accordance with its tastes or its temperaments… Every neighborhood, under the influences which tend to distribute or segregate city populations, may assume the character of a moral region.‛

Such, for example, are the vice districts, which are found in most cities. A moral region is not necessarily a place of abode. ‚It may be a mere rendezvous, a place of resort…. We must then accept these ‘moral regions’ and the more or less eccentric and exceptional people who inhabit them, in a sense, at least, as part of the natural, if not the normal, life of a city. It is not necessary to understand by the expression ‘moral region’ a place or a

7 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Folsom_Street_Fair

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society that is either necessarily criminal or abnormal. It is intended rather to apply to regions in which a divergent moral code prevails, because it is a region in which the people who inhabit it are dominated, as people are ordinarily not dominated, by a taste or a passion or by some interest…. It may be an art, like music, or a sport, like horse- racing…Because of the opportunity it offers, particularly to the exceptional and abnormal types of man, a great city tends to spread out and lay bare to the public view in a massive manner all the human characters and traits which are ordinarily obscured and suppressed in smaller communities.‛ Clearly, gay neighborhoods are such ‚moral regions.‛8

Clearly, gay neighborhoods are such ‚moral regions.‛ Such neighborhoods, however, do not tend to inhabit or produce a built environment of particular architectural significance. They tend to be located in relatively undercapitalized neighborhoods with small scale investment in the built environment. Their importance lies in the uses to which those buildings are put rather than the buildings themselves, and this creates special problems for the social preservation of sexual landscapes. These difficulties are similar to those that have been identified for other populations with limited resources.

“A socially inclusive urban landscape history can become the basis for new approaches to public history and urban preservation. This will be different from, but complimentary to, the art-historical approach to architecture that has provided a basis for architectural preservation. A more inclusive urban landscape history can also stimulate new approaches to urban design, encouraging designers, artists, and writers, as well as citizens, to contribute to an urban art of creating a heightened sense of place in the city.” (The Power of Place”, Dolores Hayden) 9

In The Power of Place, architectural historian Dolores Hayden notes the challenges of social heritage preservation that is focused on uses, meanings, and memories rather than on the architectural significance of individual structures, and she observes that these issues are particularly salient with respect to ethnic minorities, working class populations, and women. Hayden comments that ‚urban landscapes are storehouses for these social memories, because natural features such as hills or harbors, as well as streets, buildings, and patterns of settlement, frame the lives of many people and often outlast many lifetimes. Decades of ‘urban renewal’ and ‘redevelopment’ of a savage kind have taught many communities that when the urban landscape is battered, important collective memories are obliterated.‛ She observes that ‚The power of place–

8 Park, Robert E and Ernest W. Burgess. 1925. The City. Chicago: University of Chicago Press. 9 Hayden, Dolores. 1995. The Power of Place: Urban Landscapes as Cultural History. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.

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the power of ordinary urban landscapes to nurture citizens’ public memory, to encompass shared time in the form of shared territory– remains untapped for most working people’s neighborhoods in most American cities, and for most ethnic and most women’s history.‛ 10

Hayden suggests that for preservation efforts to be inclusive of gender, race and class, they must claim ‚the entire urban cultural landscape as an important part of American history, not just its architectural monuments. This means emphasizing the building types– such as tenement, factory, union hall, or church– that have housed working people’s everyday lives.‛ While Hayden briefly mentioned gay and lesbian territories, her discussion did not symmetrically address the histories of minority sexual communities.11 in her discussion, but her framework can and should be extended to articulate the specific challenges of preserving the sense of sexual place. In the case of LGBTQ populations, this means recognizing the ways in which quite ordinary buildings have been utilized as important social locations. This in turn requires understanding the inventory of institutions of LGBTQ social life, which for most of the 20th century, consisted of the following: bars, bath houses and sex clubs, retail shops, small scale production facilities, publications and press, cruising areas, residential concentrations, locations of special events, and organizational headquarters. South of Market is dense with such sites.12

Finally, many, if not most, of the gay sites South of Market are also part of the history of San Francisco’s working class. In a 1982 article on gay South of Market, Mark Thompson called the neighborhood ‚the city’s backyard.‛ He commented that ‚An early morning walk will take a visitor past dozens of small business manufacturing necessities; metal benders, plastic molders, even casket makers can all be seen plying their trades. At five they set down their tools and return to the suburbs…. A few hours later, men in black leather…will step out on these same streets to fill the nearly 30 gay bars, restaurants and sex clubs in the immediate vicinity. Separate realities that seldom touch and, on the surface at least, have few qualms about each other.‛ 13

What Thompson did not realize at the time is that most of the places patronized by those men in black leather had once been part of the neighborhood’s industrial past. As the city increasingly lost industry after World War II and as the port declined, much of the built environment of small scale production was vacated and available to be recycled

10 Hayden, Dolores. 1995. The Power of Place: Urban Landscapes as Cultural History. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. 11 Ibid., 23. 12 Thompson, Mark. 1982. “Folsom Street.” The Advocate, 8 July, 28-31, 57. 13 Thompson, Mark. 1982. “Folsom Street.” The Advocate, 8 July, 28-31, 57.

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into new uses. Timothy Stewart-Winter has noted that the emergence of the Castro as a gay neighborhood was made possible by the exodus of the working class population to the suburbs, which made working class housing, bars, and retail venues similarly available.14

Photos from the left: The Eagle (bar), Hide (nightclub), Mr. S Leather Co. (retail) provided by Derek Abrego

A similar process created the LGBTQ South of Market. Because of its industrial character, the industrial dispersion after World War II was especially pronounced South of Market, and gay re-utilization of its vacated landscape was especially dramatic. Thus, memorializing the gay history of South of Market will also highlight some aspects of its working class history. It will also demonstrate the extent to which urban history is a richly layered with consequence of the residues of meaning and memory that many populations and diverse activities leave along streets that look ordinary and in buildings that appear to be nondescript. Much of this underutilized industrial built environment was recycled as gay social space: factories and tenement buildings became sex clubs and bathhouses, machine shops became leather shops, and lunchrooms and taverns that had fed and watered the local working class population became gay bars.

While South of Market has had a particularly strong association with gay male leather, it was also a significant neighborhood for other elements of the local LGBTQ population. Although LGBTQ individuals have been well represented among the residential population, the LGBTQ presence in the neighborhood has been expressed more through commercial and social institutions than by residential concentration. The same features that made the area attractive to leather bars made it hospitable to other forms of gay sexual commerce. Most of the local gay bathhouses and sex clubs also nestled among the warehouses South of Market. Similarly, the availability of relatively low cost office space drew a substantial portion of the gay press as well as organizational headquarters. In addition, there have been numerous gay owned businesses that served a broad clientele,

14 Timothy Stewart-Winter, “The Castro: Origins to the Age of Milk,” The Gay and Lesbian Review, January-February 2009, 12-15.

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ranging from printers to shops that cleaned commercial cooking equipment. While lesbian businesses, organizations, and residents have clustered more densely in other areas, such as the Mission and Bernal Heights, there have been a number of significant lesbian sites South of Market. And despite the centrality of the Tenderloin as the focal neighborhood for San Francisco’s transgender population, South of Market has also had a transgender presence. For example, Alexis Muir, a transsexual, owned the buildings that housed several major leather bars.

Photos from the left: The End-Up (bar), Chaps II (nighclub), Stompers Boots (retail) provided by Derek Abrego

FEATURES and INDIVIDUAL ASSETS

Honoring and acknowledging the presence of LGBTQ businesses is acknowledging gathering places, such as bars and public baths with educational plaques, noting them as important to gay/leather SoMa history. Recognizing individual assets in context is recognizing a collection of resources of collective memory, despite some of them being located outside the boundaries of Western SoMa Plan area and the associated Western SoMa Special Use District (SUD).

Bars

 The Tool Box–399 4th at Harrison  Febe’s–1501 Folsom  The Ramrod–1225 Folsom (also My Place, now Chaps II) )  The Brig– 1347 Folsom (also the Inbetween, the No Name, the Bolt, the

Powerhouse )  The Arena – 399 Ninth Street (also the Stud)

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 The Ambush – 1351 Harrison Street  The Lone Star – 1098 Howard; 1354 Harrison Street  The Black and Blue — 198 Eighth Street  The BayBrick Inn – 1188-1190 Folsom (lesbian bar; also Clementina’s,

Headquarters)  The Bootcamp – 1010 Bryant Street  The Red Star Saloon – 1145 Folsom Street  The Cave – 280 Seventh Street (also the Rawhide II)  Chaps – 375 Eleventh Street  Cocktails and The Pit – 201 Ninth Street  The Leatherneck – 280 Eleventh Street (also the Covered Wagon, Dirty Sally’s,

The Plunge, the Gold Coast, Drummmaster, the Compound).  The End Up – 401 Sixth Street  The Watering Hole – 298 Sixth Street (also the Gas Station, the Round Up)  San Francisco Eagle/Eagle Tavern – 398 Twelfth St  The Stables – 1123 Folsom Street  The Stud – 1535 Folsom (aka Holy Cow)  Hole in the Wall – 289 Eighth Street (now 1369 Folsom Street)

Bathhouses/Sex Clubs

 The Folsom Street Barracks– 1147 Folsom  The Slot– 979 Folsom also the Hula Shack, Rama, The Lumberyard  The Cauldron–953 Natoma  The Sutro Baths — 1015 Folsom (also Big Town, Folsom Street Baths, Colossus,

Product, 1015)  Mr. B’s Ballroom – 224 Sixth St  Blowbuddies — 933 Harrison  The Hothouse – 374 Fifth Street  The Handball Express—973 Harrison Street  Animals – 161 Sixth Street  The Club Baths aka Eighth and Howard – 201 Eighth Street  The Club Baths aka The Ritch Street Baths – 330 Ritch Street  The Folsom Street Club – 1389 Folsom Street (also Cornholes)  890 Folsom — 890 Folsom Street  Mack – 317 Tenth Street? (now at 1285 Folsom Street)  South of Market Club/Gloryholes – 225 Sixth Street

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Retail and Small Production Facilities

Leather Shops

 Mr. S. 4 locations: 227 Seventh Street, 1779 Folsom Street, 308-310 Seventh Street, 385 Eighth Street Madame S. 321 Seventh Street, not at 385 Eighth Street.

 A Taste of Leather — 1501 Folsom, 960 Folsom, 336 Sixth Street, 317 Tenth Street, 1285 Folsom Street (also Mack)

 768 Clementina – Taylor of San Francisco

Clothing and Apparel

 Stompers Boots — 323 10th Street  Worn Out West — 1158 Howard (also Stormy Leather)

Art Galleries

 Fey—Way — 1287 Howard Street  544 Natoma – 544 Natoma

Restaurants

 Hamburger Mary’s – 1582-1590 Folsom Street  Canary Island Diner – 1270 Harrison Street  Off the Levee/527 – 527 Bryant Street

Publications and Press

 Drummer Magazine (aka Alternate Publications, Desmodus, Inc) — (At 3 locations: 15 Harriet, then 285 Shipley, then 24 Shotwell.

 Bay Area Reporter – 395 Ninth Street  Brush Creek Media – 367 Ninth Street  Bay Times – 288 Seventh Street  The Sentinel – 285 Shipley

 Pan-Graphic Press – 689 Mission Street Hotels

 Folsom Street Hotel – 1082 Folsom Street

Alleys Ringold Alley was a major site of gay male cruising, especially after the bars

closed. The original ‚Up Your Alley‛ Fair was held on Ringold in honor of that history. After the leather bars closed, men would congregate on the alley, which was right behind the Ramrod. Cars, bikes, and vans would circle the block to go

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up the one way street. Before the empty lots were fenced in, other people would use them to park vans, some of which were fitted out with entire playrooms complete with slings and other sex equipment as well as sound systems and refrigerators and other amenities.

Organizational Headquarters

 Templar Hall – 1127 Folsom Street  The Fifteen — 254 Ritch Street, then 249 Capp Street, also 191 Post Street.

National Political Organization Headquarters

 National Leather Association – 1250 Folsom Street  The Mattachine Society–689 Mission Street  Frameline– 145 Ninth Street

Religious Organizations

 Service of Mankind Church 367 Twelfth (heterosexual)  Church of the Secret Gospel – 744-746 Clementina (also 735 Tehama, 340 Sixth

Street)

Photos from the left: The Stud (bar), Power House (bar), A Taste of Leather (retail) provided by Derek Abrego

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BOUNDARIES and PROPOSED TREATMENTS

The Western SoMa Citizens Planning Task Force and City sponsored surveys have already recognized a potential historic district largely inside the Western SoMa SUD. The community also recognizes that many of the individual LGBTQ cultural assets are located throughout SoMa.

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HERITAGE PATH

The LGBTQ community is proposing a ‚heritage path.‛ This path traces places and events that took place at these streets and alleys during the latter half of the 20th Century through today, as fairs, festivals, social services and continued business operations. Exact path location and designation is to be determined through further discussion with the community.

RENAMING OF THE STREETS

Renaming of some streets has been suggested by the community and a partial list of suggestions follows. A process nomination and careful evaluation of potential honorees will have to be developed.

A comprehensive list of suggestions will be determined through further discussion with the community.

Marcus Hernandez, whose decades of writing a weekly leather column helped define and publicize South of Market as a gay neighborhood.

All of these individuals are deceased.

 Chuck Arnett, the artist who painted the mural in the Tool Box that was featured in Life Magazine in 1964. This image more than any other came to represent leather South of Market

 Alan Selby, who owned Mr. S. Leather, became one of the most active fundraisers during the AIDS crisis

 Anthony DeBlase, who as publisher of Drummer designed the Leather Pride Flag and established Leather Pride Week in San Francisco


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 And Michael Valerio, who along with Kathleen Connell founded the Folsom Street Fair, primarily as a way to protest against rampant and uncontrolled redevelopment of South of Market and to show that South of Market was indeed a vital and viable neighborhood that deserved to be preserved rather than demolished.

THE MUSEUM AND BOOKLET

The greater LGBTQ community is also proposing a museum or series of smaller permanent exhibition sites. Designation and location of the proposed museum is to be determined through further discussion with the community.

STANDARDS and GUIDELINES for REVIEW of NEW CONSTRUCTION

The LGBTQ community is proposing to follow the general social heritage resource policies in the cases a current LGBTQ asset could be changed by a mode of restoration, remodeling or demolition. However, the community wishes to add a set of strict policies to follow in the cases of remodeling including change of use as follows. The recommendations, which include urban design, economic, and zoning programs, are: a. To establish a Social Heritage Citizens Advisory Committee that will provide

guidance and advice to the Planning Department regarding the preservation,

protecting and memorialization of identified social heritage resources. b. To perpetuate LGBTQ business by requiring to replace business in-kind with special

Certificate of Heritage Compliance. c. To work with the Department of Public Works and support the perpetuation of the

Parol Lantern Festival with permanent urban design elements in the form of street

lights and pavement. d. To establish Floor Area Ratio (FAR and/or Height) exemptions for the replacement

of LGBTQ Social Heritage SUD assets. e. Whenever replacement in-kind is impossible, dedicate a portion of the new

development to community arts projects or dedicate a portion of the new development for community public events and the arts, following specific criteria for Certificate of Heritage Compliance.

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f. To place commemorative inscription in the sidewalks corresponding to some of the most significant social heritage assets in the District, similar to that of the Barbary Coast15, for educational walking tours.

The community is recommending celebrating public history, using public features as a way to educate and recognize diversity accepting this Social Heritage SUD as leaving an important legacy at the heart of the neighborhood. When new construction proposals are made for sites containing identified neighborhood social heritage resources, the following table summarizes the proposed treatments.

For additional details and explanations of the programs summarized below, please refer to Appendix 2 of this report.

15 Barbary Coast was a pleasure quarter in old San Francisco CA. The neighborhood quickly took on its seedy character during the California Gold Rush (1848 – 1858). It was known for gambling, prostitution, and crime. It is now overlapped by Chinatown, North Beach, Jackson Square, and the Financial District

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Tools for Recognizing, Protecting and Memorializing Identified Social Heritage Resources in Proposed Western SoMa Social Heritage SUDs

Programs

Administrative Certificate of Heritage Compliance

(TBD)

(given to development who voluntarily include new urban design elements that commemorate social heritage)

Streetscape improvement & public/cultural art elements (lighting, pavement, murals, etc)

Commemorative Plate

FAR Exemption (TBD)

Height Bonus (TBD)

TDRs – either as private transaction to pay for TIs or mediated to go to a fund for business TA in the district

Community Benefit Exemption

Elimination of Height Bonus

Historic/Cultural & Local Tax Credits (negotiated w/OEWD)

Tenant & Façade Improvements and other technical assistance (TA) to help existing business expand or improve – marketing, lease negotiation, etc

Community Benefit/Business Relocation Fee – to pay for relocation assistance such as brokers, lease negotiation, tenant improvements in new space, moving assistance, etc.

Enrollment in business incubator program (Mission only perhaps) – to create matches between developers and incubating businesses early in the development process

Must provide a first right of refusal to a displaced business; or select a non-formula retail principally permitted local business; or a master lease; or provide a community-use based on need (childcare, nonprofit), etc..


Appendix 1-Types of Designation

The National Park Service has a set of standards for preservation, rehabilitation, restoration and reconstruction of historic assets. These standards are neither technical nor prescriptive, but are intended to promote responsible preservation practices that help protect US irreplaceable cultural resources. They cannot, in and of themselves, be used to make essential decisions about which features of the historic building should be saved and which can be changed. But once a treatment is selected, the Standards provide philosophical consistency to the work. They are conceptual, and therefore, they need to be reinforced with specific Design Standards, Economic Development Incentives and Review Processes that provide tangibility.

Types of Treatment addressed in National Register

Preservation is the first treatment and it places a high premium on the retention of all historic fabric through conservation, maintenance and repair. It reflects a building’s continuum over time, through successive occupancies, and the respectful changes and alterations that are made.

Rehabilitation is the second treatment, emphasizes the retention and repair of historic materials, but more latitude is provided for replacement because it is assumed the property is more deteriorated prior to work.

Restoration is the third treatment, focuses on the retention of materials from the most significant time in a property’s history, while permitting the removal of materials from other periods.

Reconstruction is the fourth treatment, establishes limited opportunities to re-create a non-surviving site, landscape, building, structure, or object in all new materials.

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Appendix 2- LGBTQ Heritage SUD Mitigation Measures

FAR EXEMPTION

Floor Area Ratio is the ratio obtained by dividing the floor area of a building by the total area of the parcel upon which the building is erected. Floor Area Ratio is the minimum to maximum proportional development that could occur in a parcel. Different FAR is required in all different zoning districts. Example: in an NC, NC-T or NC-S zoning, the FAR is 1.8 to 1, meaning that in a parcel or lot of 4,500 square feet, a maximum development of 8,100 square feet could occur.

In Chinatown, the FAR requirement for total development is waived in the form of moving the use to another location. Code Section and Interpretation 124.1 (d) explains that the floor area ratio normally applying to the Chinatown Mixed use district shall not apply to uses which must relocate as a result of acquisition by the City.

Typically, if a community wants population and economic growth to continue, then land must be used more intensively. Using land more intensively will result in changes to height and density within the existing parts of the city. Some cities propose to direct growth in certain parts of the city, such as in major nodes and public transit oriented intersections, where heights increase should occur only, under specific design guidelines, limitations of density, specific community needs and urban principles hierarchies.

The LGBTQ Social Heritage SUD is proposing to grant FAR exemption for ‚replacement in-kind‛ of a traditional retail business

 In order to maintain and keep the business local as it was originally intended.  Whenever replacement in-kind is not possible, a second mitigation is allowed,

dedicating a portion of the new development to community arts projects, public events and arts, following specific criteria for Certificate of Heritage Compliance.


CERTIFICATE OF HERITAGE COMPLIANCE

A proposed Certificate of Heritage Compliance (COHC) is a document approving work on local properties in social heritage districts based on consistency with applicable design guidelines or standards. The procedures for COHC will need to be codified.

The LGBTQ Social Heritage SUD is proposing to establish an Administrative Certificate of Heritage Compliance to be granted by the Zoning Administrator for replacement in- kind of an identified at-risk LGBTQ business. Administrative Certificate of Heritage Compliance can be granted if certain conditions are established and followed.

 Certificate of Heritage Compliance would be given to new development that allows at least 2,500 square feet to replace traditional LGBTQ business that contributed to the local LGBTQ history in South of Market.

 Certificate of Heritage Compliance would be given whenever replacement in- kind is not possible, and a portion of not less than 2,000 square feet is dedicated to community arts projects, public events and local artists.

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, TAX EXEMPTIONS and TAX INCENTIVES

In the case of Colonial Heights, Virginia, partial exemption from real estate taxes (tax relief) is allowed for qualifying rehabilitated or renovated structures. For those properties that qualify, the initial increases in real estate taxes resulting from rehabilitation or renovation is excused for ten (10) years. As an economic incentive, a partial tax exemption for restoration and retention of identified resources and other local economic incentives should be analyzed and considered.

In San Francisco, existing financial incentives that can be applied for preservation include:

Property Tax Reduction: The Mills Act is perhaps the best preservation initiative available to private property owners in San Francisco.

Loans: The city has several loan programs administered the Mayor’s office of Housing (MOH) and the Mayor’s office of Economic Development (MOED) to assist in the rehabilitation of residential resources.

 Code Enforcement Rehabilitation Fund (CERF) The CERF program offers a hardship loan for a minimum of $4,250 and maximum of $15,000 to correct any

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conditions, which the City has determined in violation of the existing building

code.  Unreinforced Masonry Building (UMB) Loans: In 1992, San Francisco voters

authorized the issuance of $4,350 million in bonds to make loans available to owners of UMB buildings.

URBAN DESIGN and HEIGHTS EXEMPTIONS

Regarding heights, a proposed height exemption could be considered under the following circumstances:

a. Restoration or replacement in the neighborhood of an in-kind of a LGBTQ identified resource.

 

VISION, MISSION AND PUBLIC PARTICIPATION

It may prove very helpful in guiding mitigation determinations that a local advisory Committee be established to review new proposals for restoration or the application of mitigation measures in the cases of demolition.

VISION: The vision should support a comprehensive program of social heritage preservation at all levels of community and government to promote the use and conservation identified social resources for the education, inspiration, pleasure and enrichment of the public in a spirit of stewardship and trusteeship for future generations.

MISSION: The statement should provide leadership in preserving, restoring and maintaining social heritage resources through activities, plans and programs that support the preservation and protecting of these resources.

PUBLIC PARTICIPATION: If Western SoMa social heritage resources are to be preserved, the neighborhood representatives of Western SoMa must actively promote their preservation.

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WORKING WITH OTHER AGENCIES

Interagency work is vital in the process of social heritage preservation, protecting and memorialization. Many times, a social heritage landscape being saved from development is a success story because of grassroots activism, and common ground between land conservation and historic preservation efforts.

The LGBTQ Social Heritage SUD Proposal for Western SoMa proposes to work with the Department of Public Works and support the perpetuation of the Parol Lantern Festival with permanent urban design elements in the form of street lights and pavement.

Also, working with both the Department of Public Works and the Chamber of Commerce would be ideal to place commemorative inscriptions in the sidewalks corresponding to some of the most significant social heritage assets in the District, similar to that of the Barbary Coast16, for educational walking tours.

INTERPRETIVE PROGRAM

Many times the wish to preserve a place offers unique opportunities to develop educational and interpretive programs that integrate environmental and social heritage history together.

The LGBTQ Social Heritage SUD Proposal for Western SoMa proposes development of a Certificate of Heritage Compliance for development proposals that cannot replace LGBTQ traditional business in-kind, and a portion of not less than 2,000 square feet is dedicated to community arts projects, public events and local artists. This space would serve for education of local history by a socially appropriate artist.

16 Barbary Coast was a pleasure quarter in old San Francisco CA. The neighborhood quickly took on its seedy character during the California Gold Rush (1848 – 1858). It was known for gambling, prostitution, and crime. It is now overlapped by Chinatown, North Beach, Jackson Square, and the Financial District

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Appendix 3—LGBTQ Social Heritage Special Use District Survey

From 1941 to 1945, more than 9,000 gay servicemen and women were discharged, and many were processed out in San Francisco. 17 From 1940 to 1950, workers in World War II-related industries increased the population of SOMA by 37%.18 World War II saw a jump in the gay population.

Physically in the 1950s San Francisco planning trend was to tear down huge areas of the city and replace them with modern construction. Many buildings located in South of Market disappeared and people were displaced. Culturally, during the 1950s, City Lights Bookstore in the North Beach neighborhood was an important publisher of Beat Generation literature. During the latter half of the following decade, and the 1960s, San Francisco was the center of hippie and other alternative culture.

Since the 1960s, South of Market has been a center for the leather subculture of the gay community. At the end of each September the Folsom Street Fair is held on Folsom Street between 7th and 12th Streets. The smaller and less-commercialized but also leather subculture-oriented Up Your Alley Fair (commonly referred to as the Dore Alley Fair) is also held in the neighborhood, in late July on Folsom between 9th and 10th Streets and in Dore Alley between Folsom and Howard.19

The late 1960s brought in a new wave of lesbians and gays who were more radical and less mainstream and who had flocked to San Francisco not only for its gay-friendly reputation, but for its reputation as a radical, left-wing center.

17 (Wilpedia, History of San Francisco) 18 (http://www.smhcsf.org/soma.html ) 19 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/South_of_Market_(San_Francisco)

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The properties identified as part of the LGBTQ Social Heritage Special Use District proposal, are:

BLOCK LOT

3510003 3509015C 3519043 3520021 3522014 3760125 3730009

3730028 3755136 3729082 3756005 3756004

3754057

3756045 3756034

3519053

3519050 3521021 3760135 3519013

N/A N/A

STREET STREET NUMBER NAME

128 10th 131 10th 323 10th 375 11th 398 12th 401 6th 280 7th

239 8th 385 8th 201 9th 395 9th 399 9th

1015 Folsom

1225 Folsom 1287 Folsom

1347 Folsom

1369 Folsom 1585 Folsom 933 Harrison 1354 Harrison

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OTHER ADDRESS

LGBT

Fetish G Leather LGBTQ

G

T LGBTS G

G

G

G G

CATEGORY

Media Nonprofit Service Retail Entertainment Entertainment Entertainment Entertainment

Entertainment Retail Entertainment Media Entertainment

Bath House

Entertainment Bath House

Entertainment

Entertainment Entertainment Bath House Entertainment Street Fest Street Fest

NAME

Damron Company Folsom Street Events Stompers Boots DNA Lounge

Eagle Tavern The End Up Rawhide II

Wicked Grounds Mr. S Asia SF Bay Area Reporter The Stud Bar

Sutro Baths

KOK Mack Club & Baths

The Powerhouse

Hole in the Wall Holy Cow Blow Buddies The Lone Star Saloon Up your Alley

Folsom Street Fair

HISTORIC YEAR ACTIVE AND OTHER BUILT OR NAMES INACTIVE

ACTIVE

ACTIVE 1906 ACTIVE Chaps Bar 1900 ACTIVE The Eagle 1906 ACTIVE 1970 ACTIVE

The Cave 1906 ACTIVE The Hole in the Wall 1907 ACTIVE

ACTIVE 1907 ACTIVE 1908 ACTIVE

Arena 1906 ACTIVE Big Town, Folsom Street Baths,

Colossus, Product 1932 ACTIVE Shaft, Chaps II, Ramrod 1909 ACTIVE

1923 ACTIVE

In Between, Bolt, Brig, No Name 1907 ACTIVE Night Gallery, Folsom Street Club, Cornholes ACTIVE

The Stud ACTIVE 1953 ACTIVE 1907 ACTIVE ACTIVE ACTIVE

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BLOCK LOT

3519045

3516010

3722257

3521019 3752011 A

3753008 3725001

3731002 3731002

3731011 3754120

3730011

3755004 3728006 3730038

3728008 3756009

3776098 3757008

3729048 3733028

3732025 3753130

3731125 3755101 3755100

STREET STREET NUMBER NAME

317 10th

280 11th

593 Mission

367 12th

399 4th 374 5th 161 6th

224 6th 225 6th

298 6th 336 6th

288 7th

310 7th 164 8th 201 8th

198 8th St. 367 9th

527 Bryant

1010 Bryant Clementi 744 na

890 Folsom

960 Folsom 979 Folsom

1082 Folsom 1123 Folsom 1127 Folsom

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OTHER ADDRESS

LGBT CATEGORY

Retail

G Entertainment

Nonprofit G Service

Nonprofit Het Service

G Entertainment G Bath House G Bath House

Bath House G Bath House

G Entertainment Retail

LGBT Q Media LGBT SF Retail

Entertainment G Bath House

Entertainment G Media

G Entertainment

G Entertainment Nonprofit

Service Bath House

Entertainment G Bath House

Residential Hotel G Entertainment

Foundation

NAME

Taste of Leather

Caliente

St. Regis Service of Mankind Church

The Tool Box

The Hothouse

Animals Mr. B’s Ballroom

Gloryholes The Watering Hole

Bay Times

Mr. S The Trench

Club Baths The Black & Blue Brush Creek Media

Off the Levee Bar The Boot Camp Church of the Secret Gospel

890 Folsom Taste of Leather

The Slot Folsom St. Hotel

The Stables Templar Hall

HISTORIC AND OTHER YEAR ACTIVE NAMES BUILT OR

INACTIVE

INACTIVE

Covered Wagon, Dirty Sally, The Plunge, The Gold Coast, Drummaster, The Compound, The Leatherneck, Hot Rocks, Drummer Key Club 1929 INACTIVE Williams Building,

housed the national headquarters of the two major homophile organizations—The Mattachine Society and Daughters of Bilitis—as well as Pan Graphic Press (one of the first gay printers/small 1950- presses in the US). 1965 INACTIVE

1907 INACTIVE

1924 INACTIVE 1906 INACTIVE 1907 INACTIVE

1914 INACTIVE 1914 INACTIVE

Ges Station, Round Up 1913 INACTIVE Taste of Leather INACTIVE

1926 INACTIVE

Also at 227 7th St; currently 385 8th 1913 INACTIVE

INACTIVE 1900 INACTIVE

1920 INACTIVE 1930 INACTIVE

also a restaurant, also known as the 527 Club and Chez Mollet 1907 INACTIVE

1915 INACTIVE

1909 INACTIVE INACTIVE

INACTIVE 1906 INACTIVE

1906 INACTIVE 1910 INACTIVE 1906 INACTIVE

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BLOCK STREET STREET LOT NUMBER NAME

OTHER LGBT CATEGORY NAME HISTORIC AND OTHER YEAR ACTIVE ADDRESS NAMES BUILT OR

3755078

3755079

3729015

3756034

3521058

3516018

3730027

3731116

3760122

3757067

3525074

3727022

1145 Folsom

1147 Folsom

1250 Folsom

1285 Folsom

1501 Folsom

1582 Folsom

1188-1190 Folsom

15 Harriet

973 Harrison

1279 Harrison

1351 Harrison

1158 Howard

10 Hallam

Entertainment

G Bath House

Foundation

LGBT S Retail

G Entertainment

G Retail

Residential Hotel

L Media

G Bath House

Retail

G Entertainment

LGBT Retail

The Red Star

Folsom Street Barracks

National Leather Association

A Taste of Leather

Febes Bar

Hamburger Mary’s

Baybrick Inn

Drummer Magazine

Handball Express Baths

Canary island Diner

The Ambush

Stormy Leather

Bar enterance on Folsom and bath house enterance at 10 Hallam

Taste of Leather (upstairs)

Worn Out West

INACTIVE

INACTIVE

1983 INACTIVE

1923 INACTIVE

1923 INACTIVE

1926 INACTIVE

1916 INACTIVE

1914 INACTIVE

1921 INACTIVE

INACTIVE

INACTIVE

1907 INACTIVE

1924 INACTIVE

3729803 1287 Howard G Arts Fey-Way 1908 INACTIVE

3726046

3510020

3776106

3787040

3753082

544 Natoma

953 Natoma

254 Ritch

330 Ritch

285 Shipley

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Arts

G Bath House

Fondation

G Bath House

Media

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