Monthly Archives: April, 2014

Asking 1 Million Dollars for a 1906 Earthquake Shack in Bernal Heights

Asking 1 Million Dollars for a 1906 Earthquake Shack in Bernal Heights.

Asking 1 Million Dollars for a 1906 Earthquake Shack in Bernal Heights

Buyers looking to own a piece of San Francisco history need look no further: 331 Prentiss Street, a former earthquake shack in Bernal Heights, has recently come to market at $1.15 million. The two-bedroom, two-bath house has undergone some major renovations, including a new foundation, new kitchen and new bathrooms, and is more than twice its original 550 square feet. But it still contains three of four “shack” walls, including its historic facade (though a window and wraparound porch have been added).

The home’s current owners say the structure originally built on the land burned down in the fires caused by the city’s famed 1906 earthquake. The displaced residents had to move into one of the “refugee shacks” built to provide housing in the aftermath of the quake. When the parkland refugee camps began closing in late 1907, the Prentiss property owners hauled two shacks (one of the larger 14′ x 18′ models and one of the smaller 10′ x 14′ cottages) back to their property and combined them together to create one home. As The Chronicle recently reported, almost all of the approximately 5,000 shacks built for quake refugees are now gone, but the largest concentration that remains can be found in Bernal Heights. (A few have also been found in the Sunset, Ocean View, Daly City and even Santa Cruz.)

The current owners of the Prentiss property kept the shape of the combined shacks and added traditional trim work to the new addition to maintain the look and feel of the historic home. A sense of history was also on the owners’ minds when creating their beadboard-backsplashed kitchen and traditional bathrooms with features like a clawfoot tub and subway tile. But the home has definitely been modernized with an open floor plan, overhauled plumbing and electrical systems, and double-paned windows. The backyard also underwent a transformation of its own, with the addition of a patio, eat-in solarium and private hot tub area.

Also transformed: the price. After the quake, refugees typically paid $2 a month toward the $50 cost for their shacks. But more than 100 years—and a  major renovation and expansion—later, the $891 per square foot asking price at 331 Prentiss is actually a bargainfor the neighborhood.

From SF GATE,

Emily Landes is a writer and editor who is obsessed with all things real estate. She also has a DIY problem that she blogs about at pritical.com

 

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Asking 1 Million Dollars for a 1906 Earthquake Shack in Bernal Heights

Buyers looking to own a piece of San Francisco history need look no further: 331 Prentiss Street, a former earthquake shack in Bernal Heights, has recently come to market at $1.15 million. The two-bedroom, two-bath house has undergone some major renovations, including a new foundation, new kitchen and new bathrooms, and is more than twice its original 550 square feet. But it still contains three of four “shack” walls, including its historic facade (though a window and wraparound porch have been added).

The home’s current owners say the structure originally built on the land burned down in the fires caused by the city’s famed 1906 earthquake. The displaced residents had to move into one of the “refugee shacks” built to provide housing in the aftermath of the quake. When the parkland refugee camps began closing in late 1907, the Prentiss property owners hauled two shacks (one of the larger 14′ x 18′ models and one of the smaller 10′ x 14′ cottages) back to their property and combined them together to create one home. As The Chronicle recently reported, almost all of the approximately 5,000 shacks built for quake refugees are now gone, but the largest concentration that remains can be found in Bernal Heights. (A few have also been found in the Sunset, Ocean View, Daly City and even Santa Cruz.)

The current owners of the Prentiss property kept the shape of the combined shacks and added traditional trim work to the new addition to maintain the look and feel of the historic home. A sense of history was also on the owners’ minds when creating their beadboard-backsplashed kitchen and traditional bathrooms with features like a clawfoot tub and subway tile. But the home has definitely been modernized with an open floor plan, overhauled plumbing and electrical systems, and double-paned windows. The backyard also underwent a transformation of its own, with the addition of a patio, eat-in solarium and private hot tub area.

Also transformed: the price. After the quake, refugees typically paid $2 a month toward the $50 cost for their shacks. But more than 100 years—and a  major renovation and expansion—later, the $891 per square foot asking price at 331 Prentiss is actually a bargainfor the neighborhood.

From SF GATE, 

Emily Landes is a writer and editor who is obsessed with all things real estate. She also has a DIY problem that she blogs about at pritical.com

 
 

 

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Ellis Acts

Board of Supervisors Makes Ellis Evictions More Costly for Landlords

The bill, written by Supervisor Campos, will increase relocation payouts to existing residents by around a factor of ten. 

 

 

Whether or not the use of the Ellis Act, which allows landlords to evict tenants when taking buildings off the rental market, is a prime driver of the housing affordability crisis is a difficult question to answer. But what’s more clear, according to tenant advocates and members of the Board of Supervisors, is the high toll that such evictions take on affected individuals—of which there were at least 216 last year

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As part of ongoing efforts to roll back the worst of it, the Board last night passed a bill that would sharply increase the payment that landlords who invoke the Ellis Act are required to make to tenants. Prior to Supervisor Campos’s bill’s passage, landlords had been required to pay $5,261 per tenant.

Under the new law, relocation costs will increase to the difference between the tenant’s current rent and what the tenant would have to pay for a similar apartment  for two years. According to calculations by the City Controller’s Office, that amount could range from $44,000 for a longtime Mission resident to $47,000 for a Sunset renter.

The bill passed on a 9 to 2 vote, with Supervisors Mark Farrell and Katy Tang voting no. The Board also passed a bill by Supervisor Wiener that would allow the creation of in-law units, some of which would be rent controlled, in the Castro.

The move comes as a Sacramento committee passed State Senator Mark Leno’s bill, which would close what he calls a loophole in the state law that allows real estate speculators to invoke the act. 

It’s a political win for Campos, who is running for a seat in the State Assembly against Board President David Chiu. But will the Campos law cut down on the number of Ellis evictions? It seems hard to imagine that raising the disincentives for landlords won’t have an affect—or that it will hit small owners with less working capital—harder than large operations.